Hope and Renewal in the age of the Apocalypse

Conference Program

Tuesday, April 18, 2017
Monona Terrace Community and Convention Center

MADISON, WISCONSIN

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7:30 AM

Check-In Opens

The check-in/registration counter will remain open throughout the day.

Exhibit Area Opens

Continental breakfast will be available in exhibit area from 7:30 to 9:00 a.m.


9:00 AM

Welcome

Paul Robbins, Director, Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies


9:10 AM

Hope and Renewal in an Age of Change

Climate change, urbanization, the loss of biodiversity and other Anthropocene phenomena are reshaping our planet and straining our capacity to create a just and sustainable future. What must we do to ensure environmental quality and human equality in the face of rapid change?

Stewart Brand, founder, Whole Earth Catalog, and Long Now Foundation

Julian Agyeman, author, Sharing Cities and Just Sustainabilities


10:45 AM

Refreshment Break, Exhibits, Posters and Book Signing with Stewart Brand and Julian Agyeman


11:15 AM

Concurrent Sessions*


  1. The End of Extinction

    Does wildlife conservation need a boost from biotechnology? This session will explore 'de-extinction' (the process of using Jurassic Park-style genetic technology to bring back extinct species), and examine other issues related to the future of conservation.

    MODERATOR: Stan Temple, Beers-Bascom Professor Emeritus in Conservation, Forest and Wildlife Ecology, UW-Madison

    Stewart Brand, Founder, Whole Earth Catalog and Long Now Foundation

    Patrice Kohl, Ph.D. Candidate, Life Science Communication, UW-Madison

    CeCe Sieffert, Deputy Director, International Rhino Foundation

  2. Everyone's Cities

    If the future of humanity is urban, how do we build smart, equitable and sustainable cities? This session will explore ideas and approaches to create more inclusive and environmentally sound communities.

    MODERATOR: Jason Vargo, Assistant Scientist, Center for Sustainability and the Global Environment and the Global Health Institute, UW-Madison

    Julian Agyeman, Author, Sharing Cities and Just Sustainabilities

    Brian Grady, City of Madison Planning Division

    Satya Rhodes-Conway, Managing Director, Mayors Innovation Project; Senior Associate, COWS

    Monica White, Assistant Professor of Environmental Justice, Nelson Institute of Environmental Studies and Community and Environmental Sociology, UW-Madison

  3. The Future of Food

    Are we capable of feeding the 10-12 billion people expected to inhabit the Earth by the end of this century? What kinds of social arrangements and technologies will be required to sustainably produce food at a massive scale on a finite planet? This session grapples with those questions while considering how health and culture will be impacted by our choices.

    MODERATOR: Carol Barford, Director, Center for Sustainability and the Global Environment, UW-Madison

    Irwin Goldman, Professor and Chair, Horticulture, UW-Madison

    Shauna Downs, Hecht-Levi Fellow, Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioehtics

    Holly Gibbs, Assistant Professor, Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies; Geography, UW-Madison

  4. What Now? Preparing for Environmental Change

    Even as we work to limit future carbon emissions, significant change is already built into the Earth system. The climate will continue to shift, and more extreme and variable weather is certain to challenge our resources and resiliency. This session will explore current thinking about how to prepare for and adapt to inevitable change.

    MODERATOR: Galen McKinley, Bryson Professor, Center for Climate Research; Professor, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, UW-Madison

    Kevin Shafer, Executive Director, Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District (MMSD)

    Colleen Moran, Climate and Health Manager, Health Hazard Evaluation Section, Wisconsin Division of Public Health

    Esteban Chiriboga, GIS Specialist, Biological Services- Environmental Division, Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission (GLIFWC)

  5. Wisconsin Ideas: A Creative Look at Graduate Research in the Nelson Institute-Part 1

    Nelson Institute graduate students conduct research on a wide range of topics: future energy resources, health, wildlife habitat, food systems, toxicology, environmental history and much more. A select group of students working on masters and doctoral degrees will provide quick overviews of their work.

*Conference concurrent sessions subject to change. Speaker confirmations will be posted as received.


12:30 PM

Lunch


1:30 PM

Concurrent Sessions*


  1. The End of Facts: Finding Common Values in a Divided Society

    Research shows we may be living in a "post-factual" world. In fact, post-truth was named Oxford Dictionary's 2016 word of the year. But if facts can't succeed in bringing us together, what will? How do we bridge the gap between what experts say and what people believe? This session will explore the roles of science, values, knowledge and belief in shaping public opinion and confronting our most daunting environmental challenges.

    MODERATOR: Sharon Dunwoody, Evjue-Bascom Professor, School of Journalism and Mass Communication, UW-Madison

    Cal Dewitt, Professor, Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies, UW-Madison

    Dominique Brossard, Professor and Chair, Life Science Communication, UW-Madison

  2. The End of Growth

    Are there limits to growth? Can capitalism survive without it? Do we have sufficient energy resources to sustain our economy? This session will explore these and other questions of scarcity and growth that have driven the environmental debate for decades.

    MODERATOR: Paul Robbins, Director, Nelson Institute of Environmental Studies, UW-Madison

    Harry Saunders, Managing Director, Decision Processes Incorporated

    Eirk Olin Wright, Vilas Distinguished Professor, Sociology, UW-Madison

    Jane L. Collins, Professor, Community and Environmental Sociology, UW-Madison

  3. Histories of the Future

    Throughout history, works of fiction and non-fiction have been filled with speculation about what lies ahead, with scenarios ranging from dark and dystopian to rich and leisurely. This session will explore visions of the future in works ranging from apocalyptic or post-apocalyptic literature and film to economists' and environmental movements' predictions, as well as alternative communities' hopes.

    MODERATORS: David Zimmerman, Elizabeth Ritzmann Professor, English, UW-Madison

    Kata Beilin, Professor, Spanish and Portuguese, UW-Madison

    Melissa Charenko, Ph.D. Candidate, History of Science, UW-Madison

    Sarah Dimick, Ph.D. Candidate, UW-Madison Department of English, UW-Madison

    Lynn Keller, Bradshaw-Knight Professor of Environmental Humanities and Director, Center for Culture History and the Environment; Martha Meier Renk-Bascom Professor of Poetry, English, UW-Madison

  4. Who Owns the Future?

    How will today's environmental decisions affect future generations? What are the moral and legal ramifications of our actions and inactions? This session will explore a growing movement to protect environmental quality and natural resource availability, now and in the future.

    MODERATOR: Patty Loew, Professor, Life Science Communication, UW-Madison

    Victoria Barrett, Activist, Earth Guardians

    Adrian Treves, Associate Professor, Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies; Director, Carnivore Coexistence Lab, UW-Madison

    Anna Gade, Vilas Distinguished Achievement Professor, Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies, UW-Madison

  5. Wisconsin Ideas: A Creative Look at Graduate Research in the Nelson Institute-Part 2

    Nelson Institute graduate students conduct research on a wide range of topics: future energy resources, health, wildlife habitat, food systems, toxicology, environmental history and much more. A select group of students working on masters and doctoral degrees will provide quick overviews of their work.

*Conference concurrent sessions subject to change. Speaker confirmations will be posted as received.


2:45 PM

Refreshment Break, Exhibits and Posters


3:30 PM

Alumni Awards


3:40 PM

Harnessing the Apocalypse

Post-apocalyptic scenarios are more popular than ever. What drives our cultural fascination with the end of the world? Can dystopian fiction help us understand today's environmental challenges? Can it stimulate ideas - and the collective will - to build a just, secure and sustainable future? Three award-winning speculative fiction authors will discuss their novels, their inspiration and their hopes for the future.

Paolo Bacigalupli, author, The Water Knife, Shipbreaker and other novels

Emily St. John Mandel, author, Station Eleven and other novels

Sherri L. Smith, author, Orleans and other young adult novels


5:00 PM

Adjourn, Book signing with Paolo Bacigalupli, Emily St. John Mandel and Sherri L. Smith


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