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Screenshot of Festival ScheduleScreenshot of Google World MapWe had an exciting line-up of 50 films come to Tales from Planet Earth 2009! A one-page pdf of the entire weekend's schedule is available here. Curious as to where in the world our tales of Planet Earth hailed from? Check out this map! We also had a number of non-film activities built around the festival with our community partners. Check out these activities here!

2009 Festival Kickoff

Keynote: Green the Ghetto and How Much It Won't Cost Us (2009)

Majora Carter (45 min.)

Friday, November 6, 7:00 pm

Wisconsin Union Theater

Majora CarterCarter is a MacArthur "genius grant" recipient and the founder of Sustainable South Bronx, a pioneering green-collar job training and placement system in one of the most environmentally and economically challenged parts of the US. She is also a co-host of the Sundance Channel's The Green and the public radio series "The Promised Land." Passionate, inspiring, and one of the most innovative thinkers about how to expand the environmental movement to encompass urban peoples and issues, more than 1,000 audience-goers joined Carter for a highly fitting start to a festival on the broad theme of Justice!

Trouble the Water (2008)

Tia Lessin and Carl Deal (96 min., color, 35mm, US)

Friday, November 6, 8:00 pm

Wisconsin Union Theater

Trouble the WaterThe accolades bestowed upon Trouble the Water have not stopped coming since the film premiered last year. Named one of the best films of 2008 by Time, The New Yorker, The New York Times, and Entertainment Weekly and also receiving nominations from the Producer's Guild of America and the Academy Awards, Trouble the Water is simply, as Manohla Dargis of The New York Times put it, "one of the best American documentaries in recent memory." The film makes use of footage shot by aspiring rap artist Kimberly Rivers Roberts, as she and her neighbors in the Lower Ninth Ward of New Orleans are trapped by Hurricane Katrina. What follows is an extraordinary portrait of terror, survival, and redemption. The film makes you question all over again the events surrounding the hurricane and how Americans think about and respond to natural disasters. An absolute MUST-SEE film!
Visit the film's official website

Landscapes of Labor

Sleep Dealer (2008)

Alex Rivera (90 min., color, 35mm, US)

Saturday, November 7, 9:00 pm

Wisconsin Union Theater

Sleep DealerAlex Rivera's Sleep Dealer, a multiple Sundance Award winning science-fiction masterpiece, imagines a future in which all U.S. borders are closed to immigration yet foreign workers continue to perform labor remotely via robotic connections. After Memo Cruz's home is destroyed in an attack, he travels to Tijuana with dreams of working in the high-tech labor factories, even though workers there go until the point of collapse. Along the way, he meets the mysterious Luz who is trying to use him for her own reasons. A mind-blowing, satirical look at modern labor and the uses of people, this film will change how you think about people's relationships to the land and asks you to consider what it is we really are arguing about in our recent debates over U.S. immigration policy. Part of a three-film retrospective of Rivera's work, along with The Sixth Section and Papapapá. Filmmaker was in attendance.
Visit the film's official website

The Sixth Section (2003)

Alex Rivera (26 min., color, DVD, US)

Saturday, November 7, Noon

Fredric March Play Circle

The Sixth SectionAlex Rivera is seeking to challenge and destroy many of the assumptions underlying Americans' debates over immigration. A child of Peruvian and Irish-American parents, Rivera brings his unique perspective to an exploration of immigration and its myriad impacts – documenting the ways in which Americans rely upon immigrant labor and ways in which many of these immigrants, far from being a silent and exploited underclass, are organizing to empower themselves. In The Sixth Section, Rivera highlights the efforts of Grupo Unión, a coalition of Mexican immigrants who work in New York state in order to support their community of Boqueron, Mexico. Their goal - to provide their community with something it needs but would never do for itself: build a baseball stadium! Part of a three film retrospective of Rivera's work, along with Sleep Dealer and Papapapá. Filmmaker was in attendance. (Showed with Papapapá)
Visit the film's official website

Papapapá (1995)

Alex Rivera (28 min., color, DVD, US)

Saturday, November 7, Noon

Fredric March Play Circle

PapapapaIn yet another innovative work by Alex Rivera, Papapapá humorously explores immigration issues by comparing the assimilation of immigrant peoples and immigrant foods. In this case, Rivera parallels the migration of a form of potato from Incan Peru north to become part of diets throughout North America with an immensely personal journey following the journeys of his Peruvian father as he migrated from Lima to the United States. Part of a three-film retrospective of Rivera's work, along with Sleep Dealer and The Sixth Section. Filmmaker was in attendance. (Showed with The Sixth Section)
Visit the film's official website

Man of Aran (1934)

Robert Flaherty (76 min., b/w, 35mm, UK)

Saturday, November 7, 3:30 pm

MMoCA

Man of AranRobert Flaherty's classic Man of Aran set the standard for 1930s "docufiction" – ethnographic re-enactments that present the lives and labors of people remote from movie-going audiences. At the time, perhaps nowhere was more remote, and yet enticing, than the Aran Islands off the western coast of Ireland. Flaherty's romantic presentation of the hardscrabble conditions of a family of fishermen - presented only as a "Man of Aran," "His Wife," and "His Son" - as they go about their lives along the islands' cliffs proved so enticing that the film forever altered the lifestyles that were its subject, as it created a growing market for tourism to the islands. (Showed with How the Myth Was Made)

How the Myth Was Made (1978)

George Stoney (60 min., color, DVD, US)

Saturday, November 7, 3:30 pm

MMoCA

How the Myth Was MadeSome 40 years after the release of Robert Flaherty's classic Man of Aran, director George Stoney returned to the Aran Islands to see the aftermath of the original film and how it had changed the lives of the people living there. What he found in How the Myth Was Made was that the enduring appeal of Man of Aran had shifted the islands' primary economic activity from fishing to movie-based tourism. He also found some of the surviving actors from the original film, many of whom had become locked into characters and landscapes artificially held static to satisfy the demands of Aran-inspired tourists. One of two George Stoney films featured in the festival (see also Planning for Floods), this is a fascinating exploration of how cinema can create tangible impacts on people and environments. Filmmaker was in attendance. (Showed with Man of Aran)

Losers and Winners (2006)

Ulrike Franke and Michael Loeken (96 min., color, DVD, Germany)

Saturday, November 7, 3:45 pm

Fredric March Play Circle

Losers and WinnersAn official selection of over 30 film festivals and winner of numerous documentary film awards, Losers and Winners faithfully recounts the dismantling of a steel coke plant in the heart of Germany's Ruhr Valley for relocation to China. The simultaneous slowdown of European industry and explosion of the Chinese economic behemoth has transformed landscapes of labor around the globe and, in this case, led to the transplanting of what was once the world's most sophisticated coke plant after only eight years of operation at its original site in Germany. In the race to relocate the plant quickly, the new owners bring hundreds of Chinese workers to Germany, creating a clash of cultures as each country's workers view the demolition of a manufactured landscape with opposing feelings of optimism, despair, alienation and understanding. (Showed with Solitary Life of Cranes)
Visit the film's official website

Solitary Life of Cranes (2008)

Eva Weber (27 min., color, DV Cam, UK)

Saturday, November 7, 3:45 pm

Fredric March Play Circle

Solitary Life of CranesPeople engage with landscapes in a variety of ways and from many different perspectives. Eva Weber explores perhaps one of the most ignored perspectives, hidden in plain sight in almost every big city and developing landscape around the world. Capturing images not for the faint of heart (or acrophobic), Weber bravely ventures high above London to discover its world of crane operators. What she discovers in Solitary Life of Cranes is a complex relationship between man and machine, executing sweeping movements with balletic precision and in the process reshaping the landscape below. (Showed with Losers and Winners)
Visit the film's official website

An Injury to One (2002)

Travis Wilkerson (53 min., color, 16mm, US)

Saturday, November 7, 7:00 pm

MMoCA

An Injury to OneAn Injury to One is one of the most stylistically innovative documentaries in years, with Travis Wilkerson weaving together a film noir tale about labor unrest in the early 1900s in Butte, Montana's copper mines. Ultimately, the murder of mining labor activist Frank Little, still unsolved, has had ramifications that persist to this day. An Injury to One examines the many impacts of this unrest – from inspiring famed mystery writer Dashiell Hammett’s Red Harvest (with Hammett rumored to have been complicit in the murder as a former Pinkerton detective, no less!) to the ongoing environmental issues of copper mining and the leftover toxic Superfund lake that still sits atop Butte's mine. Trust us, this film is not to be missed.

The Greening of Southie (2008)

Ian Cheney (73 min., color, DVD, US)

Sunday, November 8, 2:00 pm

Fredric March Play Circle

The Greening of SouthieIan Cheney and Curt Ellis created one of the most engaging environmental documentaries in years with their 2007 triumph King Corn about the environmental ramifications of America's agribusiness system. Now they are turning to the question of environmental impacts of construction with The Greening of Southie, the story of the construction of a green-certified building on the south side of Boston. Funny and poignant, the film follows the construction workers accustomed to decades of standard construction practices and now suddenly confronted with the "building of tomorrow" and all the unique challenges it brings. One of the more popular screenings at the 2009 Wisconsin Film Festival, we are bringing this film back by popular demand! Filmmaker was in attendance. (Showed with 2200 Degrees)
Visit the film's official website

2200 Degrees (2008)

Jesse Epstein (3 min., color, DVD, US)

Sunday, November 8, 2:00 pm

Fredric March Play Circle

2200 Degrees screenshotSteel workers at Bethlehem Steel made the steel that went into the Chrysler Building, the Empire State Building, the Golden Gate Bridge, and armaments for World War II. Today, as America's manufacturing sector has drastically downsized in the wake of the new economic order, the plant has closed down, leaving behind a deserted landscape of memories. In Jesse Epstein's poignant short, Ritchie Check - a worker at the plant for over 30 years - strolls through the skeletal remains of the factory that helped forge America. (Showed with The Greening of Southie)

Harvest of Shame (1960)

Fred W. Friendly (60 min., b/w, 16mm, US)

Sunday, November 8, 4:15 pm

UW Cinematheque

Harvest of ShameAiring just after Thanksgiving in 1960, Edward R. Murrow and Fred Friendly's Harvest of Shame revealed the plight of migrant agricultural workers in Florida who helped to produce the bountiful harvests Americans had just finished celebrating. Murrow closed the film by noting: "Migrants have no lobby. Only an enlightened, aroused and perhaps angered public opinion can do anything about the migrants." Watching the film almost 50 years later, one doesn't know whether to admire the film's forward thinking about this issue or to be depressed that migrants continue to be disenfranchised and at the mercy of public opinion, even as they provide an ever-growing and vital link between the land and our dinner tables.

Precious Resources

Near Oracle - A Film About Biosphere 2 (2010 - Work-in-Progress)

Shawn Rosenheim (~90 min., color, DVD, US)

Saturday, November 7, 7:00 pm

UW Cinematheque

Near OracleIn September 1991, eight men and women began a two-year mission to live inside a sealed four-acre complex in the desert of Arizona known as Biosphere 2. The group's avowed scientific purpose was to see how well they could maintain a series of artificially-created biomes - deserts, coral reefs, temperate rainforests - as part of an entirely closed, self-sustaining system. The project was supposed to consider the issues and potential success of future missions to create permanent self-sustaining colonies on the moon or Mars. But many outside critics wondered whether it was as much showmanship as science. With mounting costs and mounting public curiosity, Biosphere 2 was rushed to completion, all the while enduring a clash of personalities trying to steer the project in wildly divergent directions. In this sneak preview of the not-quite-final fine cut of Shawn Rosenheim's film, an extraordinary and gripping portrait of the project emerges from unprecedented access to the "biospherians'" own home movies, interviews with many of the key project participants, and hundreds of hours of behind-the-scenes footage. Watch as the biomes begin to breakdown, people endure cult-like diets, rivalries and jealousies erupt, and all the inhabitants begin to suffocate in their own CO2. Ultimately, you're left to wonder how much hubris it takes to believe we can ever try to engineer Biosphere 1 (Earth) on large scales when as meticulously controlled a setting as Biosphere 2 goes so awry! Filmmakers were in attendance.

What's on Your Plate? (2009)

Catherine Gund (73 min., color, DVD, US)

Saturday, November 7, 10:00 am

MMoCA

What's on Your PlateFrom books - such as Eric Schlosser's Fast Food Nation and Michael Pollan's Omnivore's Dilemma - to films - such as Morgan Spurlock's Super Size Me and Curt Ellis and Ian Cheney's King Corn - the American public has received numerous warnings in the last 10 years about the changing global food system and its consequences for public health and the environment. But Catherine Gund raises the question of whether these messages are reaching our most vulnerable food consumers - America's children. In this rollicking film, Gund follows two New York City pre-teens, Sadie and Safiyah, as they take their own journey across the systems that provide them with food and take charge of their health against the onslaught of unhealthy food choices bombarding them. An official selection of the 2009 Berlin Film Festival, What's On Your Plate? is a film your whole family should experience together. Filmmakers were in attendance.
Visit the film's official website

Our Daily Bread (2005)

Nikolaus Geyrhalter (92 min., color, 35mm, Germany)

Saturday, November 7, 9:30 pm

UW Cinematheque

Our Daily BreadAt the 2007 Tales from Planet Earth, the screening of Edward Burtynsky and Jennifer Baichwal's Manufactured Landscapes filled up the theater in only a few minutes. At Tales from Planet Earth in 2009, Nikolaus Geyrhalter's Our Daily Bread is likely destined for the same fate. Training a similar artistic lens on the global food system, Geyrhalter wordlessly captures extraordinary tableaus and landscapes of astonishing power. From the treatment of livestock to the application of pesticides and the working conditions of laborers, Our Daily Bread lays open for questioning each link of the complex processing chain that connects us to our landscapes via the food on our plates. Winner of 10 film festival awards and official selection of over 50 festivals.
Visit the film's official website

Deep Down (2010 - Work-in-Progress)

Jen Gilomen and Sally Rubin (~60 min., color, DV Cam, US)

Saturday, November 7, 7:00 pm

Fredric March Play Circle

Deep DownAppalachian Mountain coal today provides 35 percent of America's electricity - in 20 years this figure is expected to double. Deep Down explores the implications of this reliance on coal and the impacts across Appalachian communities that are literally being split apart by mountaintop mining, as well as impacts in communities reliant upon coal-fired power plants. As the effects of this coal dependence spread across our land and atmosphere, it is time to reconnect the disparate human stories of impact, use, and extraction that are all too often forgotten in debates over this precious resource. In Deep Down we see the poignant tale of two old friends in Maytown, Kentucky both ambivalent about plans for a new mountaintop strip mine and unsure whether to sell out to the mining officials. Is staying and living right next to teeth jarring dynamite explosions really better than moving away? What happens to their friendship, to their community, if they stay? What happens if they go? Deep down, the divides over this issue are more personal and emotional than just a question of coal. Filmmakers were in attendance.
Visit the film's official website

Garbage Dreams (2009)

Mai Iskander (82 min., color, US)

Saturday, November 7, 1:30 pm

Fredric March Play Circle

Garbarge DreamsGarbage Dreams is the story of the zaballeen, some 60,000 people at the bottom of Egyptian society, who nevertheless are indispensable to the functioning of Cairo, as they daily collect and recycle 80 percent of Cairo's garbage. But globalization is threatening their way of life, as foreign companies (far more concerned with revenues than recycling) are taking their garbage from them. As the world around them changes, three teenage boys - Adham, Osama, and Nabil - must navigate their uncertain futures, as they dream of a better life and try to do right by their families. Winner of the Al Gore Reel Current Prize for important current environmental film!
Visit the film's official website

A Drop of Life (2007)

Shalini Kantayya (17 min., color, BetaSP, US)

Sunday, November 8, 4:45 pm

Fredric March Play Circle

A Drop of LifeSet in the near future, A Drop of Life is the story of two women – a teacher in a rural Indian village and an African American corporate executive, whose lives intersect as they both confront a lack of access to clean drinking water. Mirabai, the teacher, notices that since a privatized well has come to her village the number of children getting sick has dramatically increased. Nia, the executive, wants nothing more than to prove to her investors that this pilot project is profitable and safe. Ultimately, each woman will have to make the choices that serve her best - their own lives may depend on it. This science fiction film raises global questions about the impact of water privatization. A winner of the Audience Choice Award at the Rain Bird Intelligent Use of Water film competition, director Shalini Kantayya has used A Drop of Life as a teaching and advocacy tool worldwide to promote water conservation. (Showed with Restoring the Mauri of Lake Omapere)
Visit the film's official website

Restoring the Mauri of Lake Omapere (2007)

Simon Marler (80 min., color, DV, New Zealand)

Sunday, November 8, 4:45 pm

Fredric March Play Circle

Restoring the Mauri of Lake OmapereAlthough its subject is halfway around the world from Wisconsin, the themes of Simon Marler's beautiful film Restoring the Mauri of Lake Omapere will resonate strongly with people living in the Yahara River watershed. Agricultural runoff, toxic algae, mechanical weed harvesting - these issues have a familiar ring for anyone acquainted with the history of Lakes Mendota, Monona, Waubesa, and Kegonsa. Marler adds to these issues the story of the Maori people and their struggle to restore the mauri, or life spirit, of a small New Zealand lake. This is a film that leaves you with hope that grassroots efforts worldwide really can make a difference. (Showed with A Drop of Life)

Men of the Lake (Los Hombres del Lago) (2007)

Aaron I. Naar (12 min., b/w, DV Cam, Bolivia/US)

Saturday, November 7, 4:15 pm

UW Cinematheque

Men of the LakeThe Bolivian village of Fuñaca Tintamaria, founded in 2000 B.C., is one of the oldest and poorest communities in Latin America. The Uru-Muratos who live there are known as the "Men of the Lake" for their close relationship with Lake Poopó. As a result of their history of enslavement, the immigration of many other peoples to the lake, water contamination, and global warming, the historic livelihoods of these fishermen today is gravely threatened. An incredibly powerful short film, Aaron Naar's Los Hombres del Lago was an official selection of the 2008 Hot Docs film festival in Toronto. (Showed with Upstream Battle)
Visit the film's official website

Lighting the Seventh Fire (1995)

Sandra Osawa (48 min., color, DV Cam, US)

Sunday, November 8, 2:00 pm

Wisconsin Union Theater

Lighting the Seventh FireBringing Tales from Planet Earth's global explorations home to Wisconsin, Lighting the Seventh Fire takes up the issue of the Chippewa Indians' struggle to revive traditional methods of spearfishing against fierce oppposition from other Wisconsin residents fearful of the loss of the walleye resource. Director Sandra Osawa reveals how a seemingly simple question of "resource management" is intertwined with issues of racism, historical obligations of treaty rights, and how people choose to define natural "resources." Behind it all, she explains the Chippewa prophecy of the seven fires that encompass seven eras of time for the Chippewa people. Still to come is the time of the seventh fire, when the Chippewa's lost traditions will be restored. (The film played as part of a series of events related to native peoples' resource issues - preceding the film was Winona LaDuke's keynote and following the film was a panel discussing resource issues.)

Upstream Battle (2008)

Ben Kampas (59 min., color, PAL Digibeta, Germany)

Saturday, November 7, 4:15 pm

UW Cinematheque

Upstream BattleHailed by reviewers as "one of the Toronto Film Festival's Must See Films" and a powerfully "rare story of environmental triumph," German director Ben Kempas' Upstream Battle takes us to the Klamath River in northern California, where Native American tribes have spent decades fighting to preserve their traditional fishing rights from the threats of damming and agriculture. Yet the battle over these fishing rights, like so many environmental tales, is not a simple story of right and wrong. As the operators of the local dams point out, in an era when carbon emissions and global warming are of paramount concern, hydroelectric power offers one of the cleanest sources of energy. Ultimately, Upstream Battle offers hope that even in the most complex environmental challenges, there may be room for compromise and constructive outcomes. (Showed with Men of the Lake)
Visit the film's official website

Ghost Bird (2009)

Scott Crocker (85 min., color, BetaSP, US)

Saturday, November 7, 2:00 pm

UW Cinematheque

Ghost BirdFor decades, the citizens of Brinkley, Arkansas have believed that the giant ivory-billed woodpecker still exists in their neighboring swamps, despite no official sightings of the bird anywhere in 60 years. When scientists recently announced that the bird had been found, the news was celebrated around the world as the rediscovery of a lifetime. Since then, however, no one has replicated the new official sighting, despite millions of dollars in federal funds being diverted from other endangered species projects to focus on this elusive (maybe illusive?) species. What explains the draw of this bird? What can efforts to save it tell us about how we commidify and view endangered species as a resource over which to battle? Ghost Bird, a spirited look at all these issues, was an official selection of the 2009 Hot Docs Film Festival. Filmmaker was in attendance.
Visit the film's official website

Sharkwater (2006)

Rob Stewart (89 min., color, 35mm, US)

Saturday, November 7, 10:00 am

Wisconsin Union Theater

SharkwaterRob Stewart is a man of single-minded vision – a passionate diver and lover of sharks, he has made it his life's mission to try to stop the annihilation of the world's shark species. Traveling around the world, Sharkwater is his testament both to the importance of sharks to oceanic ecosystems and to the catastrophic devastation of sharks occurring daily due to human fear and greed. Yet Stewart makes a compelling case that a loss of sharks would not mean just the loss of a few charismatic animals but in fact lead to the death of the oceans as we know them and possibly even to cataclysmic results for all of humankind! A beautiful film filled with stunning visual images, Sharkwater is one of those movies that stays with you long after you leave the theater.
Visit the film's official website

The Cove (2009)

Louie Psihoyos (92 min., color, 35 mm, US)

Saturday, November 7, 7:00 pm

Wisconsin Union Theater

The CoveOne of the most controversial and yet well-reviewed documentaries to emerge in years, The Cove comes across as an espionage thriller and environmental advocacy film rolled into one. At stake is the annual slaughter and capture of dozens of dolphins in the hidden cove of the Japanese town of Taiji. Former renowned dolphin trainer Ric O'Barry, who trained the original Flipper, has come from America to Taiji to try to expose the practice, which is so well hidden and guarded by the local fishermen that he has to recruit a team of divers, filmmakers, and commandos to hide secret cameras, microphones, and other equipment that can capture the slaughter on film. The paramilitary operation against another culture (as the filmmakers ultimately choose to frame it) comes under intense local suspicion and resistance, as the fishermen resist interference in their decades-old traditional fishing practices. In the end, the film leaves you with so many questions - is this killing of the dolphins morally wrong? If so, why does it make us so much angrier at the Japanese than at those of us complacent in the deaths of thousands of dolphins inadvertently killed in fishing nets to supply Americans with fish and to supply dolphins for our aquaria? Why does the killing of dolphins provoke such unparalleled outrage compared to the slaughter of millions of animals in American factory farms? Deeply disturbing, edge-of-your-seat gripping, and highly controversial, you'll debate this film for some time to come. Winner of Audience Awards at Sundance, Hot Docs, Silver Docs, and almost a dozen other film festivals.
Visit the film's official website

Strange Weather

The Hunger Season (2008)

Beadie Finzi (60 min., color, DV, UK and US)

Sunday, November 8, 1:00 pm

First United Methodist Church

The Hunger SeasonWhen watching news about famines and starving people in foreign countries, we often feel removed from the problem, even as we express pity and regret. Beadie Finzi's The Hunger Season shatters our illusions of distance, however, revealing the complex interconnections between global economic systems, the hunger for new biofuel sources of energy, global climate change, political unrest, and resulting devastation of drought and famine for millions of people around the world. Tracing the journey of food aid from the fields of Wisconsin farmers to USAID and finally to Swaziland, where Justice, a village leader, struggles to feed his neighbors, Finzi brings home our role in hunger crises and also our ability to help avert such problems. A moving experience, The Hunger Season had its sneak peek world premiere at a Tales from Planet Earth event in October 2008. After the film there was a special meal that profiled a new national engagement project built around the film, called "Meal & A Movie in a Box," which was designed through Tales from Planet Earth's pilot screening of the film in October 2008.
Visit the film's official website

Cooked (2011 - Work-in-Progress)

Judith Helfand (~60 min., color, DV, US)

Sunday, November 8, 5:30 pm

MMoCA

CookedIn July 1995 one of the largest natural disasters in recent history took place in Chicago, one of America's largest cities - and practically no one noticed or even remembers today! Indeed, Mayor Richard Daley challenges whether anything out of the ordinary even happened during that fateful summer week when temperatures climbed into triple digits for days on end. In his book Heat Wave: A Social Autopsy of Disaster in Chicago, Eric Klinenberg persuasively argues, however, that a hidden disaster did occur, resulting in the deaths of more than 700 people. Building on Klinenberg's work, director Judith Helfand brings her trademark wit and incisive eye to Chicago's disaster and its long-term implications for people living in cities everywhere. In Cooked, she finds that what we call "natural" disasters so often are actually "social" disasters. Yet Helfand also finds courageous individuals, like Orrin Williams and his Growing Home organization, challenging the status quo and repairing urban social networks that protect and benefit everyone. The director of the multiple award-winning Blue Vinyl and our 2007 festival opener Everything's Cool, Helfand produces films that are thought-provoking, uplifting, and always essential viewing. Filmmaker was in attendance.

The Plow that Broke the Plains (1936)

Pare Lorentz (25 min., b/w, 16mm, US)

Saturday, November 7, 1:00 pm

MMoCA

The Plow that Broke the PlainsUnder FDR's New Deal, the government Resettlement Administration undertook an ambitious project to document American life and the need for government programs to address the various crises crippling the country. To this day, the films produced through this program are the only peacetime production by the United States government of films intended for commercial release and public viewing. Yet far from producing staid bureaucratic works, the program resulted in some of the most advanced and moving documentaries ever produced up to that time. And among these films, director Pare Lorentz's portraits of environmental devastation remain some of the most brutal and revealing ever captured on film -- monumental landmarks in the history of American non-fiction film. In The Plow that Broke the Plains, he documented the landscape and aftermath of the Dust Bowl and, in the process, made a compelling case for the development of the Soil Conservation Service. One of two Pare Lorentz documentaries shown at the festival. (Showed with The River and Planning for Floods)

The River (1938)

Pare Lorentz (31 min., b/w, 16mm, US)

Saturday, November 7, 1:00 pm

MMoCA

The RiverLegendary director Pare Lorentz's portraits of environmental devastation during the Great Depression remain some of the most brutal and revealing ever captured on film -- monumental landmarks in the history of American non-fiction film. In The River, he documented the effects of deforestation leading to massive soil erosion and flooding in the Mississippi River watershed. In the process, Lorentz made a compelling case for the development of the Tennessee Valley Authority. Interestingly, unlike his other masterpiece, The Plow that Broke the Plains, which was widely rejected by audiences in the Dust Bowl region at the time of release, The River met with universal praise throughout the South, despite its similar laying of blame for regional natural disaster on human mismanagement of the land. The different reception of the two films seems due solely to Lorentz's choice to glorify the Confederacy in one scene of The River, an unusual narrative twist for modern audiences to ponder. One of two Pare Lorentz documentaries shown at the festival. (Showed with The Plow that Broke the Plains and Planning for Floods)

Planning for Floods (1974)

George Stoney (28 min., color, DVD, US)

Saturday, November 7, 1:00 pm

MMoCA

George Stoney, Planning for FloodsMade for the Environmental Defense Fund in 1974 on the heels of then-record flooding on the Mississippi River, George Stoney's Planning for Floods explores the philosophy of the U.S. Corps of Engineers in controlling floods and reveals how this philosophy creates a false sense of security and mastery of nature - control repeatedly shown to be illusory in natural disaster after natural disaster. Stoney's film foreshadowed future weather-related disasters that were made worse by humans' hubristic disregard for historical floodplains and the forces of strange weather. Planning for Floods is one of two films (see also How the Myth Was Made) from George Stoney's distinguished career that we are pleased to be showing at Tales from Planet Earth to coincide with a visit from the filmmaker, who is considered the father of public access television in the United States and a visionary documentarian of the 1970s and '80s. Filmmaker was in attendance. (Showed with The River and The Plow that Broke the Plains)

The Grapes of Wrath (1940)

John Ford (128 min., b/w, 35mm, US)

Saturday, November 7, 8:30 pm

MMoCA

The Grapes of WrathJohn Ford's adaptation of John Steinbeck's classic novel The Grapes of Wrath remains a beloved classic of American cinema for good reason. Winner of Academy Awards for Best Director and Best Supporting Actress, the film captured the palpable sense of loss and devastation created by the Dust Bowl in the 1930s for the poor farmers and migrant laborers also coping with the Great Depression. The trials of the Joad family, having lost their farm, were familiar tales for many in the long line of "Okies" who left the Dust Bowl in search of of work, any work, in California and found only hard labor and falling wages. Their struggle to retain life and dignity is a moving story told with tremendous power and conviction. The Dust Bowl stands as one of the worst natural disasters in history, forever stripping away untold tons of fertile topsoil and permanently remaking the economies and landscapes of large swaths of the United States. As our global economy once again is rocked to its core and as we face the prospect of new disruptive and large-scale climatic upheavals, The Grapes of Wrath's themes turn out to be eerily familiar and prescient.

Sun Come Up (2010 - Work-in-Progress)

Jennifer Redfearn (~15 min., color, DV, US)

Sunday, November 8, 4:00 pm

MMoCA

Sun Come UpThis is one of a series of clips from works-in-progress that Tales from Planet Earth screened as a group along with a panel discussing the alarming phenomenon of climate change refugees. Sun Come Up is the story of the Carteret Islanders, a people living on a remote archipelago 50 miles from Papua New Guinea. Due to human-induced global climate change, the sea levels are rising - threatening the islanders' fresh water supply, eroding their shorelines, and subjecting them to ever more unpredictable storms. Unwilling to stand by passively while these mounting troubles threaten her people's way of life, Ursula Rakova searches for new land for her people to move to on nearby Bougainville Island, which has troubles of its own in the wake of a recent civil war. Disturbing in its implications, yet inspiring in its portrait of people's resilience, Sun Come Up promotes a much-needed discourse about how we as a planet will respond to a growing crisis of our own making. Filmmaker was in attendance. (Showed with In the Footsteps of Elephants and Easy Like Water)
Visit the film's official website

In the Footsteps of Elephants (2011 - Work-in-Progress)

Sarita Siegel (~10 min., color, DV, US and UK)

Sunday, November 8, 4:00 pm

MMoCA

In the Footsteps of ElephantsThis is one of a series of clips from works-in-progress that Tales from Planet Earth screened as a group along with a panel discussing the alarming phenomenon of climate change refugees. Sarita Siegel's In the Footsteps of Elephants, co-produced by Tales creator Gregg Mitman, is the parallel story of two cultures who once lived together, now caught in conflict. Racked by one of the worst droughts in decades, the Turkana tribe in northern Kenya and Uganda have been forced from their traditional migratory pastoral lifestyle to a largely sedentary existence, farming on marginal lands. At the same time, the elephants of the area have seen their traditional migration routes closed off by human settlement and their cultures and social hierarchies decimated by the ivory trade and conflict with their human neighbors. This film chronicles the tensions and overlapping stories of these two cultures, both on the verge of extinction and both caught in much larger webs of climate change, global trade, and war. In the end, where once the Turkana people migrated in the footsteps of elephants now both elephants and humans will have to find new ways of living together on a changing planet. Co-Producer Gregg Mitman was in attendance. (Showed with Sun Come Up and Easy Like Water)

Easy Like Water (2010 - Work-in-Progress)

Glenn Baker (~15 min., color, DVD, US)

Sunday, November 8, 4:00 pm

MMoCA

Easy Like WaterThis is one of a series of clips from works-in-progress that Tales from Planet Earth screened as a group along with a panel discussing the alarming phenomenon of climate change refugees. In Bangla, "Easy like water" translates roughly as "piece of cake." The irony is that in Bangladesh - with a population half that of the U.S. crammed into the equivalent of Iowa, hovering at sea level and comprised of a massive river delta downstream from the Himalayas - water poses a relentless threat. Climate change is leading to increasing flooding, with estimates that flooding will cover 20% of Bangladesh by 2030, creating more than 20 million "climate refugees." So Mohammed Rezwan, an architect by training, has conjured up the equivalent of environmental Jujitsu, harnessing the power of water to educate and unify the community. Since the increasing flooding means many children can't get to schools, he decided to bring the schools to the children - using a fleet of solar-powered, internet-enabled school boats to provide education to impoverished Bangladeshis, including many girls who have never had access to school before. An uplifting and important film, Easy Like Water reminds you that every crisis also is an opportunity to take action. Filmmaker was in attendance. (Showed with Sun Come Up and In the Footsteps of Elephants)

In the Company of Animals

Mine (2009)

Geralyn Pezanoski (80 min., color, BetaSP, US)

Sunday, November 8, 7:30 pm

UW Cinematheque

MineGeralyn Pezanoski's powerful first feature film shines a light on a forgotten class of Hurricane Katrina victim - the Gulf Coast region's pets (and their owners). The film ably documents the immediate aftermath of the storm that killed or stranded over 100,000 animals and the valiant rescue efforts by volunteers from around the country. But Mine doesn't stop there. Instead, it wades into far deeper and more emotionally charged terrain, following the months of suffering and struggle since 2005 - as pets that were rescued and sent to animal shelters around the country become legally adopted by new families, even as their former families continue to search for them. There are so many tales here so skillfully and emotionally told. Victor has been desperately searching for his dog Max. Tiffany is smitten with him and couldn't imagine giving him back after rescuing him. Whose dog is Max? Gloria refused to be evacuated without her dog Murphy until finally she was forced to leave Murphy behind by the National Guard. Should she not be able to get her dog back now? Through it all hangs questions about what it means for an animal to "belong" to someone, what rights are animals entitled to, and why our relationships to animals are so powerful and yet so convoluted. A heartbreaking and powerful film, Mine clearly demonstrates how some of the greatest tragedies often emerge in the absence of villains and the presence only of good intentions and how often the simplest desire to love another being can be fraught with enormous obstacles. Winner of the Audience Award at the 2009 SXSW Festival in Austin. Filmmaker was in attendance.
Visit the film's official website

Wild New York (2009)

Adam Welz (24 min., color, PAL DVD, South Africa)

Saturday, November 7, 11:00 am

UW Cinematheque

Wild New YorkIn the past two decades, many jaded New Yorkers have come to realize that nature truly is everywhere, even in a place as seemingly human-dominated and artificial as New York City. Sightings of coyotes and celebrity critters, such as the red-tailed hawks Pale Male and Lola, have given the human fauna of the city a renewed sense of kinship with their non-human cousins. Adam Welz's engaging Wild New York offers a lively profile of some of the people who have become dedicated urban wildlife watchers and the hawks, kestrels, and peregrine falcons that have provided them with company in the midst of the United States' most urbanized landscape. Filmmaker was in attendance. (Showed with Milking the Rhino) (Photo credit: © Francois Portmann)

Milking the Rhino (2008)

David E. Simpson (83 min., color, DV Cam, US)

Saturday, November 7, 11:00 am

UW Cinematheque

Milking the RhinoMilking the Rhino is one of the films we are most excited to be bringing to Tales from Planet Earth! The film is one of the first ever to consider wildlife conservation from the perspective of those who live in close promixity to animals, rather than the usual perspective of remote armchair conservationists who don't have to live with the consequences of firsthand interactions with wildlife. This powerful documentary profiles the lives of rural Africans in Kenya and Nambia who are choosing to participate in community-based conservation programs that empower them to have a positive stake in the future survival of wildlife and "milk the rhino" to get their fair share of ecotourism revenue. Putting people back into the frame of the wildlife documentary, this film serves as an important rebuke to most wildlife films that create imagined Edens where people don't exist and don't play any role in animals' lives. Film's associate producer was in attendance. (Showed with Wild New York)
Visit the film's official website

Princess Mononoke (1997)

Hayao Miyazaki (134 min., color, 35mm, Japan)

Saturday, November 7, 1:00 pm

Wisconsin Union Theater

Princess MononokeRoger Ebert declared that Princess Mononoke "is one of the most visually inventive films" ever and one of the best animated films he'd ever seen. No wonder, as this complex tale of humans, forest animals and nature gods fighting for their share of the planet is one of director Hayao Miyazaki's anime masterpieces. Following his earlier work Nausicaä of the Valley of the Winds (which was one of our more popular screenings at the 2007 Tales from Planet Earth), this allegorical tale from Miyazaki follows Prince Ashitaka as he journeys to find the cause of nature's imbalance and finds Princess Mononoke fighting the forces of Lady Eboshi, the leader of a people learning ever more industries while forgetting how to talk to animals and the environment.

Never Cry Wolf (1983)

Carroll Ballard (105 min., color, 35mm, US)

Saturday, November 7, 4:15 pm

Wisconsin Union Theater

Never Cry WolfTales from Planet Earth is pleased to be screening one of director Carroll Ballard's many extraordinary films that documents the intense connections that exist between humans and animals. Ballard captures the often spiritual quality of the human-animal bond that famed naturalist E.O. Wilson has suggested is an innate "biophilia," or love for other creatures on the planet. And in his films, Ballard also reveals the great lengths humans often go to study and preserve our animal kin, such as Never Cry Wolf's adaptation of the real-life efforts of Farley Mowat to research wolves in Northern Canada and his growing awareness of wolves' unfair reputation and persecution. While the impressive visuals and stories of this film makes it ideal viewing for the whole family, Ballard's work is far from a kid's film but, in fact, required viewing for anyone interested in the intertwined fates of all humans and animals.

The Chances of the World Changing (2005)

Eric Daniel Metzgar (99 min., color, Digibeta, US)

Saturday, November 7, 9:20 pm

Fredric March Play Circle

The Chances of the World ChangingAn astonishingly moving and intimate portrait of one man's quest to keep from losing himself as he tries to save the world, The Chances of the World Changing follows several years in the life of Richard Ogust, a writer and turtle collector who took on the challenge of trying to save many of the world's endangered turtle species and in the process lost his home, his career, and almost his sense of self. Even as he continually confronts insurmountable obstacles - lack of funding, dying turtles, illegal smugglers - the most amazing thing (as director Eric Daniel Metzgar has noted) is that this film concerning extinction is less about gloom and doom than it is about persistance, hope and survival.
Visit the film's official website

Born Free (1966)

James Hill (95 min., color, 35mm, UK)

Sunday, November 8, Noon

UW Cinematheque

Born FreeToday many people remember Born Free primarily for its Oscar-winning score and title song. Yet for many the film was, and remains, a transformative experience. In fact, President Obama revealed in a recent interview that it was one of the first films he ever saw and one that deeply affected him. And with good reason, as the film faithfully tells Joy Adamson's amazing real-life tale of raising three orphaned lion cubs in captivity and then successfully rehabilitating the youngest cub, Elsa, to be able to live and survive in the wild on her own. For the film's stars, Virginia McKenna and Bill Travers, the experience of shooting the film so moved them they became lifelong animal rights activists. For audiences today, the film will cause you to rethink what exactly the boundaries are between "humans" and "nature," between "wild" and not. In the end, how we think about these categories has profound implications for whether humans and wildlife will successfully be able to co-exist in the future.

The Adventures of Chico (1938)

Horace and Stacy Woodard (60 min., b/w, 16mm, US)

Sunday, November 8, 2:00 pm

UW Cinematheque

The Adventures of Chico screenshotA near-forgotten gem from the 1930s, The Adventures of Chico is a surprisingly modern tale. Depicting a year in the life of Chico, a Mexican boy helping his family of goat herders, the film offers a beautiful and amusing look at how humans interact with both domestic and wild animals. Over the course of the year, Chico raises an orphaned roadrunner, confronts a mountain lion after his family's livestock, and meets two coatimundi who get into loads of trouble when they overturn the family pantry. Unwilling to sugar-coat (or Disney-ify) too much truths about animal life and death, directors Horace and Stacy Woodard present an uplifting portrait of rural life and of the emotional bonds that we maintain with the animals around us. Following the film was a presentation by Four Lakes Wildlife Center about the rescue and rehabilitation of wild animals here in Madison!

Old Partner (2008)

Chung-ryoul Lee (75 min., color, DV Cam, South Korea)

Sunday, November 8, 5:45 pm

UW Cinematheque

Old Partner"The ox is my karma." This simple statement sums up the deep personal attachment felt by Mr. Lee, an aging peasant farmer in South Korea, who lives each day in close physical and spiritual companionship with his ancient ox. A slow, quiet and moving documentary that feels more like an intimate fictional film, Chung-ryoul Lee's Old Partner has capitvated audiences at the Sundance Film Festival and the World Cinema Documentary Competition. Underlying the entire film is the recognition that two individuals from entirely separate species can develop a bond and kinship that is nothing short of friendship -- complete with all the joys, frustrations, struggles and heartbreak that make friendship so difficult and yet worthwhile. While the film itself strives to avoid being pigeon-holed either as pure idyll or elegy, one is left to consider the value and importance of close human-animal kinship and whether its time is forever waning.

Closing Night Films

Saving Luna (2008)

Suzanne Chisholm and Michael Parfit (92 min., color, 35mm, Canada)

Sunday, November 8, 5:00 pm

Wisconsin Union Theater

Saving LunaSaving Luna cuts across many of the major debate in modern conservation - from wildlife management to the resource rights of native peoples. But more than any didactic debate or polemic, this film is simply a beautiful portrait of a living being - an orca whale named Luna - who touches hundreds of intersecting lives. Filmmakers Suzanne Chisholm and Michael Parfit initially journeyed to Vancouver Island in Canada on a three-week magazine assignment to cover a charming anecdote about an orphaned whale that played with boaters and loggers. Their journey ended up lasting more than four years, as they found themselves at the heart of a complex and emotional struggle involving issues of anthropomorphism and whether humans have the ability, right, and responsibility to transcend the human-animal barrier to try to understand another species. One of the highlights of Tales from Planet Earth and a winner of audience and jury prizes at 22 film festivals! (Showed with Northern Ice: Golden Sun)
Visit the film's official website

Northern Ice: Golden Sun (2002)

Faith Hubley (6,5 min., color, 35mm, US)

Sunday, November 8, 5:00 pm

Wisconsin Union Theater

Northern Ice, Golden SunNorthern Ice, Golden Sun explores the Inuits’ deep attachment to the natural world. They hunt, fish, dance, care for their young and make art in tune with the seasonal cycle of the Arctic. During the fearsome winter months, they rely on the mysterious powers of the Shaman. The new threat of industrial invasion looms over their land and their culture. But, the Inuit survive. The land reawakens, and all the people and animals rejoice under the glowing sun. One of several animated shorts by Faith and John Hubley shown as part of a retrospective celebration of their work. (Showed with Saving Luna)

Yes Men Fix the World (2009)

Andy Bichlbaum, Mike Bonanno, and Kurt Engfehr (90 min., color, Digibeta, US)

Sunday, November 8, 7:30 pm

Wisconsin Union Theater

Yes Men Fix the WorldFollowing up on their smash success from 2003, The Yes Men, professional rabble-rousers Andy Bichlbaum and Mike Bonanno are back in a sequel, Yes Men Fix the World. The mission of The Yes Men is to produce razor-edged satire that exposes corporate hypocrisy and the institutions of power around the globe that lock us into unsustainable lifestyles without our knowledge or consent. In their first film, the target was the World Trade Organization. This time around, they are taking on a variety of corporate targets - Dow Chemical Company and its refusal to acknowledge responsibility in the Bhopal disaster, Exxon-Mobil, contractors cleaning up after Hurricane Katrina, and more. Tthe only film at our festival that opens with a rousing water ballet and that managed to knock $2 billion off the stock value of a single corporation - almost 400 people joined us for a rousing end to the festival weekend! A selection of the 2009 Sundance, Berlin, and Hot Docs Film Festivals and winner of the Audience Award at the Berlin Film Festival!
Visit the film's official website

Voyage to Next (1974)

John Hubley (9.5 min., color, DVD, US)

Sunday, November 8, 7:30 pm

Wisconsin Union Theater

Voyage to NextMother Earth and Father Time examine the state of the planet Earth. Humankind has divided itself into a system of nationalistic boxes. Father Time projects twenty years of horror. Mother Earth and Father Time discuss the foolish choices humans have made in the past. The humans realize their plight and begin to imagine their preferred worlds. One of several films by John and Faith Hubley shown as part of a retrospective celebration of their work. (Showed with Yes Men Fix the World)

Tales After Dark

This year, Tales from Planet Earth was pleased to partner with the Wisconsin Union Directorate Film Committee (WUD) to offer late-night programming during WUD Film's normal weekend schedule that took a playful, more off-beat approach to notions of "environmental film." Based on the great audience feedback, we look forward to collaborating with WUD Film for similar programming in future festivals.

Soylent Green (1973)

Richard Fleischer (97 min., color, 35mm, US)

Friday, November 6, 11:59 pm

Fredric March Play Circle

Screenshot from Soylent GreenIt's the year 2022 and the world is running out of food. Overpopulation and pollution make life in New York City and cities like it hellish -- with most people sleeping in every nook and cranny of available space and paying exorbitant prices for one-time pleasures as simple as strawberries but otherwise subsisting on corporate-produced food supplements Soylent Red and Orange, or the new supplement -- Soylent Green. Detective Thorn (Charlton Heston) is tasked with tracking down why the executive of the Soylent Corporation has been murdered. His investigation leads him to one monstrous conclusion! A classic in the genre of eco-apocalyptic films that have increasingly pervaded modern culture, Soylent Green has a payoff that makes it required viewing for anyone wanting to understand the social and political fears and preoccupations of the 1970s that created the modern world we inhabit today.

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (1990)

Steve Barron (93 min., color, DVD, US)

Saturday, November 7, 11:59 pm

Fredric March Play Circle

Screenshot from Teenage Mutant Ninja TurtlesCowabunga dude! These "heroes in a half-shell" have had an amazingly resilient pop cultural longevity, with many sequels, remakes, and subsequent television series. But this is the film that really started it all -- with turtles Raphael, Leonardo, Donatello, and Michaelangelo under the guidance of the wise rat Splinter taking on the evil Shredder. Born from the contamination of toxic ooze seeping into the New York City sewer system, these mutants are a reminder that we should never forget that thoughtlessly disposing of waste can lead to surprising and unexpected outcomes: perhaps even pizza-loving ninja turtles!

Additional Events

Keynote: The Economy for the Next Seven Generations

Winona LaDuke (45 min.)

Sunday, November 8, 1:00 pm

Wisconsin Union Theater

Winona LaDukeWinona LaDuke (Anishinaabe) is an internationally renowned activist working on issues of sustainable development, renewable energy and food systems. She lives and works on the White Earth reservation in northern Minnesota, and is a two time vice presidential candidate with Ralph Nader for the Green Party. As Program Director of the Honor the Earth, she works nationally and internationally on issues of climate change, renewable energy, and environmental justice with Indigenous communities. In her own community, she is the founder of the White Earth Land Recovery Project, one of the largest reservation based non-profit organizations in the country, and a leader in the issues of culturally based sustainable development strategies, renewable energy and food systems. (Her keynote was followed by a screening of Lighting the Seventh Fire and a panel on native peoples' resource issues)

Ojibwe Treaty Rights and 25 Years of Culture-Based Environmentalism

Patty Loew, with Winona LaDuke, Mic Ishram, and Nick Hockings (45 min.)

Sunday, November 8, 2:45 pm

Wisconsin Union Theater

Ojibwe Treaty Rights and 25 Years of Culture-Based EnvironmentalismThis panel explored the environmental experience of the Ojibwe Bands since the historic Voigt Decision. Panel members shared personal stories about moving past the boatlanding violence of the 1980s and their stewardship role in efforts to protect and preserve the natural resources of the Great Lakes region. The panel consisted of Mic Isham (Chair of GLIFWC's Voigt Intertribal Task Force and a member of the Lac Courte Oreilles Tribal Council), Nick Hockings (tribal spearer and owner of Waswagoning, a recreated 18th century Ojibwe Village and educational resource center), and Winona LaDuke, a prominent Ojibwe environmental advocate and author). Patty Loew - Associate Professor in the Department of Life Sciences Communication; Ojibwe author, and documentary producer for Wisconsin Public Television - moderated the panel. (Preceded by Winona LaDuke's keynote and a screening of Lighting the Seventh Fire.)

Emily Hubley Retrospective and Animating Science

Emily Hubley, with Judith Helfand, Alex Rivera, Ian Cheney and Shawn Rosenheim (90 min.)

Sunday, November 8, 2:00 pm

MMoCA

Emily Hubley RetrospectiveHow do filmmakers translate complex scientific and technical ideas into easy-to-grasp, compelling cinema? Increasingly, they are turning to the work of talented animators like Emily Hubley (Blue Vinyl, What's on Your Plate?, Hedwig and the Angry Inch, and Toe Tactic), who can use a more artistic and free-form approach than is possible in pure narration or scientific charts and graphs. In a freewheeling conversation, filmmakers Judith Helfand, Alex Rivera, Ian Cheney, and Shawn Rosenheim joined Hubley in discussing the promises and pitfalls of animating science and how to reach the public when your subject starts to turn complex. As part of the discussion, Hubley showcased the work of her parents, John and Faith Hubley, who for decades provided some of the most beautiful, award-winning, and compelling environmental-themed animation anywhere. (As part of this retrospective we screened Second Chance: Sea, Whither Weather, and Children of the Sun)

Second Chance: Sea (1976)

Faith Hubley (10.5 min., color, 35mm, US)

Second Chance: SeaThe history of the ocean culminates with the present abuse of our most important resource. Do we have a second chance? Part of a retrospective of the award-winning animation of John and Faith Hubley. (Showed with Whither Weather and Children of the Sun)

Whither Weather (1977)

Faith Hubley (10 min., color, 35mm, US)

Whither WeatherWhither Weather explores the interplay between Earth life and Earth climate. We see how weather affects food; how food, or lack of it, affects people, and how people, in turn, affect weather. We experience the current eco-catastrophe and wonder whether our tampering will result in a new ice age or in an equally dangerous global heating. Part of a retrospective of the award-winning animation of John and Faith Hubley. (Showed with Second Chance: Sea and Children of the Sun)

Children of the Sun (1960)

John Hubley (10 min., color, 35mm, US)

Children of the SunThe story of a healthy child who has enough to eat is juxtaposed with the story of an undernourished child representing three-fourths of the world's children. The film ends with the United Nations’ commitment to all the children of our planet. Part of a retrospective of the award-winning animation of John and Faith Hubley. (Showed with Second Chance: Sea and Whither Weather)

 

 

Want to pick a place you're interested in and learn about a movie set in that area? Check out our interactive map, showing where our various tales from planet Earth hailed from. Click on any marker for more details about the film set in that location.


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