November 1-3, 2013 · Madison, Wisconsin

2013 Speakers

Schedule Speakers Sponsors

Anna Aberg

Anna Åberg
Doctorate, History of Technology, KTH Environmental Humanities Laboratory
Introduced Promised Land and The Weather War, Sunday, November 3, 2013, 3:45 p.m., Chazen Museum of Art

Dr. Anna Åberg works at the Environmental Humanities Laboratory (EHL) at the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, where she defended her doctoral thesis "A Gap in the Grid" (on the history of natural gas in Sweden) in May 2013. She has a long-standing interest in film and research communication, especially science fiction and future visions of energy technology. As a part of a new cooperation between CHE and the EHL, Anna will organize a transfer of Tales from Planet Earth to Stockholm in April 2014.


Kathryn Anderson

Kathryn Anderson
Ph.D. Student, Community and Environmental Sociology, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Discussed Sons of the Land, Saturday, November 2, 2013, 1 p.m., Madison Museum of Contemporary Art

Kathryn Anderson is a PhD student in Community and Environmental Sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her research and teaching interests focus on the links between globalization, capitalism, and the changing ways we live in communities and relate to our environment. Her current research compares how different advanced capitalist societies address agricultural pollution on one hand and the economic pressures that are pushing farmers to get big or get out on the other.


Audrey Arner

Audrey Arner
Co-owner, Moonstone Farm
Discussed Sons of the Land, Saturday, November 2, 2013, 1 p.m., Madison Museum of Contemporary Art

Audrey Arner has lived and worked at Moonstone Farm near Montevideo, MN, since 1973. She is an artist, cultural worker, facilitator, change maker, grandmother and perennial agriculturalist. While providing development assistance to organizations in agriculture, environment and the arts, she also co-owns and co-manages with her husband Richard Handeen, their 240 acres that support a grass-fed beef herd, a vineyard, timber, fruits, nuts, ornamentals, medicinals, a farm stay and farm store.


Carol Cook

Carol Cook
ESL Specialist and Coordinator
Discussed A Will for the Woods, Sunday, November 3, 2013, 3 p.m., Madison Museum of Contemporary Art

Carol Cook is a retired English as a Second Language specialist and coordinator. Her interest in natural burial fits with her personal philosophy about after death practices.



Kevin Corrado

Kevin Corrado
Coordinator, Natural Path Sanctuary
Discussed A Will for the Woods, Sunday, November 3, 2013, 3 p.m., Madison Museum of Contemporary Art

Kevin Corrado is a natural cemeterian at Natural Path Sanctuary, which is a nature preserve burial ground located at the Linda and Gene Farley Center just outside of Verona, WI. Previously, he was a hospital social worker for over thirty years. He is committed to the goal of nurturing the birth of multiple conservation/green cemeteries throughout the Midwest for his generation, his sons' generation, and beyond. He has also served on the boards of the Wisconsin Chapter of the National Association of Social Workers (NASW), the Regent Neighborhood Association, and Quaker Housing.


Marie-Hélène Cousineau

Marie-Hélène Cousineau
Co-director, Before Tomorrow
Opening Roundtable, Friday, November 1, 2013, 7 p.m., The Marquee Theater at Union South;
Discussed Before Tomorrow, Friday, November 1, 2013, 9 p.m., The Marquee Theater at Union South

Marie-Hélène Cousineau is a leader in the development of women's film in Igloovik, Nunavit in Canada. In 1991, she founded Tarriaksuk Video Centre, with Zacharias Kunuk and Norman Cohn, and Arnait Video Productions, the first women's collective independent production company in the Arctic, with Mary Kunuk and Madeline Ivalu. Cousineau produces and directs works with Arnait, including the personal documentary Unakuluk, Dear Little One and collaborative works with Mary Kunuk. Cousineau wrote the screenplay for and, with Madeline Ivalu, co-directed Before Tomorrow, Arnait's first feature film, produced as the third of a ground-breaking cinema trilogy by Igloolik Isuma Productions. It premiered at the 2008 Toronto International Film Festival, where it won the Best Canadian First Feature award. In 2010 it was nominated for nine Genie awards, including a nomination for Best Director. She also coordinated the Nunavut tour of Atanarjuat: The Fast Runner, the first film of the trilogy, and was the still photographer for the film.


Peter Galison

Peter Galison
Professor, History of Science, Harvard University
Discussed Containment, Saturday, November 2, 2013, 3:30 p.m., The Marquee Theater at Union South

Peter Galison is a professor of History of Science at Harvard University and director of its Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments. Galison's main work explores the complex interaction between the three principal subcultures of twentieth century physics--experimentation, instrumentation, and theory. In addition, Galison has launched several projects examining the powerful cross-currents between science and other fields, such as in his book (with Lorraine Daston), Objectivity (2007), asking how visual representation shaped the concept of scientific objectivity, and how atlases of scientific images continue, even today, to rework what counts as right depiction. He is director of two past films -- Ultimate Weapon and Secrecy -- and is currently at work on a film about the debate on how and where to bury nuclear materials, Containment.


Andrew Garrison

Andrew Garrison
Director, Trash Dance
Discussed via Skype Trash Dance, Sunday, November 3, 2013, 5 p.m., The Marquee Theater at Union South

Andrew Garrison is an independent filmmaker based in Austin, Texas, who works in both documentary and fiction. His past films include the documentary feature Third Ward TX (2007) and the narrative triptych The Wilgus Stories (2000), both of which premiered at SXSW and aired on PBS. Additional films include the award-winning shorts, Fat Monroe (1990) and Night Ride (1994). Garrison's work has earned him Guggenheim, Rockefeller, NEA and AFI Fellowships, and his films have screened at Sundance, SXSW, Berlin International Film Festival, Locarno Film Festival, Sydney Film Festival, BFI London Film Festival and the New York Film Festival. He is an Associate Professor of Film and Digital Media Production at The University of Texas at Austin.


Matthew Gidden

Matthew Gidden
Ph.D. Candidate, Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Discussed Pandora's Promise, Saturday, November 2, 2013, 7 p.m., The Marquee Theater at Union South

Matthew is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Wisconsin-Madison studying nuclear engineering and energy policy. He previously attended Texas A&M University where he received a B.S. in nuclear engineering. Matthew works in the Fuel Cycle Research Group at UW - Madison under Professor Paul Wilson. His research interest is primarily fuel-cycle simulation and analysis and related policy topics, such as used-fuel recycling, long-term fuel storage, and nuclear nonproliferation.


Jim Healy

Jim Healy
Director of Programming, UW Cinematheque, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Introduced 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, Sunday, November 3, 2013, 1 p.m., Chazen Museum of Art

Jim Healy began his position as Cinematheque Director of Programming in October, 2010. From 2001-2010, he was Assistant Curator, Exhibitions in the Motion Picture Department at George Eastman House in Rochester, NY. Prior to that, he was a Film Programmer for the Chicago International Film Festival. Jim is also currently the American Programming Correspondent for the Torino Film Festival in Turin, Italy and he is also Director of Programming for the Wisconsin Film Festival.


Judith Heilizer

Judith Heilizer
Psychologist
Discussed A Will for the Woods, Sunday, November 3, 2013, 3 p.m., Madison Museum of Contemporary Art

Judith Heilizer is a clinical psychologist based in Madison who has a personal and spiritual interest in the natural burial experience.




Shania Jackson

Shania Jackson
Writer/Narrator, Protect Our Future
Discussed Protect Our Future, Sunday, November 3, 2013, 1 p.m., UW Cinematheque

Shania Jackson, a 14-year-old freshman at Ashland High School, wrote and narrated Protect our Future. Shania is a pow wow fancy dancer and traditional rice harvester. Film credits include the documentary short, Save our Rice, produced at the 2011 Tribal Youth Media Workshop in Bad River.




Joel Kaipainen

Joel Kaipainen
Ph.D. Student, German, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Introduced Transfer, Sunday, November 3, 2013, 1 p.m., Madison Museum of Contemporary Art

Joel Kaipainen is a Ph.D. Student in the Department of German. He studied at the University of Augsburg, at Paris IV and the University of Pittsburgh where he received his master's degree in 2010. His current research at the UW focuses on how the discourses on globalization, economic change and crisis are negotiated in contemporary literature, film and video games. Other study interests include transnationalism, labor history, early and contemporary cinema, photography, and video game studies.


Deepti Kakkar

Deepti Kakkar
Co-Director, Powerless
Discussed Powerless, Sunday, November 3, 2013, 3 p.m., The Marquee Theater at Union South;
Panel on Future of the Electrical Grid, Sunday, November 3, 2013, 1:45 p.m., The Marquee Theater at Union South

Deepti Kakkar considers herself a part-time filmmaker and part-time historian. She came from a small town with little access to electricity and therefore felt a personal connection to the story she shares in her film, Powerless. She and co-director Fahad Mustafa spent two and half years on the project amassing 250 hours of filming in 110-degree heat and controlling crowds of over 300 people every time their cameras came out.


Judd Kinzley

Judd Kinzley
Assistant Professor, History, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Introduced Fallen City, Saturday, November 2, 2013, 3:45 p.m., Madison Museum of Contemporary Art

Judd Kinzley is a historian of modern Chinese history at the University of Wisconsin-Madison with research and teaching interests that include environmental history, state power, industrial development, and wartime mobilization. His research tends to center around understanding the connections that exist between state power and the natural world in various Chinese peripheral and border regions. He is currently working on a manuscript on mining and the extension of the Chinese state into Xinjiang province in China's far west during the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries.


Heinz Klug

Heinz Klug
Professor, Law, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Introduced Dear Mandela, Saturday, November 2, 2013, 3:15 p.m., Chazen Museum of Art

Heinz Klug is Professor of Law at the University of Wisconsin Law School and an Honorary Senior Research Associate in the School of Law at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. Growing up in Durban, South Africa, he participated in the anti-apartheid struggle, spent 11 years in exile and returned to South Africa in 1990 as a member of the ANC Land Commission and researcher for Zola Skweyiya, chairperson of the ANC Constitutional Committee. He was also a team member on the World Bank mission to South Africa on Land Reform and Rural Restructuring. He has taught at Wisconsin since September 1996. His research interests include: constitutional transitions, constitution-building, human rights, international legal regimes and natural resources. His current teaching areas include Comparative Constitutional Law, Constitutional Law, Human Rights and Humanitarian Law, Property, and Natural Resources Law.


Zacharias Kunuk

Zacharias Kunuk
Co-Director, Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change
Opening Roundtable (via Skype), Friday, November 1, 2013, 7 p.m., The Marquee Theater at Union South

Born in Kapuivik in the eastern Canadian Arctic, filmmaker, artist, and hunter Zacharias Kunuk (Inuit) spent his childhood summers traveling and hunting with his family and his winters going to school in Igloolik, where his family were involuntarily settled when Kunuk was nine years old. Originally working as a successful soapstone carver, Kunuk purchased a video camera in 1981 and the next year joined the Inuit Broadcasting Corporation in Igloolik, where he was senior producer and station manager until he left in 1991. Kunuk's first feature film, Atanarjuat/The Fast Runner, is a milestone in the development of an independent indigenous cinema. In 2001, it won the Camera d'Or for Best First Feature at the Cannes film Festival and six Genie awards in Canada, including for Best Picture and Best Director.


Florencia Mallon

Florencia Mallon
Professor, Latin American History, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Introduced Nostalgia for the Light, Saturday, November 2, 2013, 9 p.m., UW Cinematheque

Born in Santiago, Chile, Florencia Mallon received her B.A. from Harvard University and her Ph.D. from Yale University. She is currently the Julieta Kirkwood Professor of Latin American History at UW-Madison. She received the Bryce Wood Award for Best Book in Latin American Studies for Peasant and Nation: The Making of Postcolonial Mexico and Peru (1995); and the Bolton-Johnson Prize for the Best Book in Latin American History for Courage Tastes of Blood: The Mapuche Indigenous Community of Nicolás Ailío and the Chilean State, 1906-2000 (2006). In 2012 she published her first novel, Beyond the Ties of Blood, with Pegasus Books.


Kelly Maynard

Kelly Maynard
General Manager, Spring Rose Growers Cooperative
Discussed Sons of the Land, Saturday, November 2, 2013, 1 p.m., Madison Museum of Contemporary Art

Kelly Maynard is currently the Technical Assistance Facilitator and General Manager of the Spring Rose Growers Cooperative in Madison, WI and has dedicated the last nine years to designing and providing technical assistance to underserved agricultural producers. Kelly served as an Agroforestry volunteer with the Peace Corps in Paraguay from 2003-2005, managed a forestry project in Indonesia for Conservation International from 2006-2008, and then attended the University of Wisconsin-Madison where she received her Master of Science in Agroecology in 2010. In her work with Spring Rose she focuses on providing the necessary marketing and production support for Hmong and Latino immigrant farmers to help them build viable farm businesses through a variety of local sales channels.


Cathy Middlecamp

Cathy Middlecamp
Professor, Environmental Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Discussed Pandora's Promise, Saturday, November 2, 2013, 7 p.m., The Marquee Theater at Union South

Cathy Middlecamp's work lies at the the intersection of science, people, and the planet. Her scholarship centers on designing, teaching, and assessing courses that connect chemistry to topics such as radioactivity, air quality, and climate change. Middlecamp serves as the editor-in-chief of Chemistry in Context, a 25-year national curriculum project of the American Chemical Society that engages undergraduate students in learning chemistry in the context of real-world issues. She is a fellow of the Association for Women in Science (2003), American Association for the Advancement of Science (2004), and the American Chemical Society (2009) and was elected to Phi Beta Kappa at Cornell University (1971).


Kristi Minahan

Kristi Minahan
Board Member, Natural Path Sanctuary
Discussed A Will for the Woods, Sunday, November 3, 2013, 3 p.m., Madison Museum of Contemporary Art

Kristi Minahan was a founding board member of the Trust for Natural Legacies, a non-profit dedicated to providing after-death education, advocating for natural burials, fostering connections in the death-care industry, and being a local resource for after-death choices in southern Wisconsin. She currently serves on the board of the Natural Path Sanctuary, Dane County's first natural cemetery. Outside of her work on green burials, Minahan is a water quality specialist for the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. She earned her master's degree in Conservation Biology and Sustainable Development from the University of Georgia-Athens.


Sabine Moedersheim

Sabine Moedersheim
Associate Professor, German, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Introduced Metamorphosen, Saturday, November 2, 2013, 1:30 p.m., The Marquee Theater at Union South

Sabine Moedersheim is a professor of German culture and literature at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and team member of the research group "Environmental Futures" at the Center for German and European Studies. Her main research explores forms of visual representation from early modern print culture to contemporary art, literature and popular culture. She currently teaches a course on German environmental movements and their history, with a focus on models of sustainable urban planning and architecture, citizen participation, and Germany's transition to renewable energies (Energiewende).


Robb Moss

Robb Moss
Senior Lecturer, Visual and Environmental Studies, Harvard University
Discussed Containment, Saturday, November 2, 2013, 3:30 p.m., The Marquee Theater at Union South

Robb Moss is a senior lecturer in Visual and Environmental Studies at Harvard University, as well as an accomplished filmmaker. His film Secrecy (co-directed with Peter Galison), explored the issues of maintaining government secrets in a democratic society and premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in 2008, with subsequent screenings at festivals in Tribeca, San Francisco, Austin (SXSW), Boston, Nantucket, Philadelphia, Palm Beach, Ashland, Croatia, Warsaw, Rio de Janeiro, and Vancouver. As a cinematographer, he has shot films in Japan, Ethiopia, Turkey, Liberia, The Gambia, and Mexico on such topics as famine and the large-scale structure of the universe. He was on the documentary jury at the 2004 Sundance Film Festival and the 2005 Denver and Chicago International Film Festivals, and has thrice served as a creative adviser for the Sundance Institute Documentary Labs.


John Nelson

John Nelson
Adjunct Professor, Civil & Environmental Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Discussed Pandora's Promise, Saturday, November 2, 2013, 7 p.m., The Marquee Theater at Union South

John Nelson is a consultant to the design and construction industry and an adjunct professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, College of Engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. John provides strategic intelligence and solutions guidance to both public and private organizations. Services include strategy, market development, mentoring, and project participation. John helps organizations change to maximize their potential — by aligning marketplace opportunities with organizational abilities, and by developing people and competencies through projects. During his tenure in industry, he served as Project Engineer, Department Head, Project Manager, Vice President and Chief Executive Officer at Affiliated Engineers. His background includes design, applications and research experience with dynamic building systems, along with business and project management.


Rob Nixon

Rob Nixon
Professor, English, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Introduced Unravel and Megacities, Saturday, November 2, 2013, 1 p.m., Chazen Museum of Art;
Introduced Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change, Sunday, November 2, 2013, 3:30 p.m., UW Cinematheque

Rob Nixon is the Rachel Carson Professor of English at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He received his Ph.D. from Columbia University and is the author of London Calling: V. S. Naipaul, Postcolonial Mandarin (Oxford University Press); Homelands, Harlem and Hollywood: South African Culture and the World Beyond (Routledge); Dreambirds: the Natural History of a Fantasy (Picador); and Slow Violence and the Environmentalism of the Poor (Harvard University Press 2011). He teaches environmental studies, postcolonial studies, creative nonfiction, African literature, world literature, and twentieth century British literature. He has been the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Fulbright-Hays Fellowship, a MacArthur Foundation Peace and Security Fellowship, and a National Endowment for Humanities Fellowship. He is currently a Senior Fellow at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Institute for Research in the Humanities.


Ruth Ozeki

Ruth Ozeki
Author, A Tale for the Time Being
Opening Roundtable, Friday, November 1, 2013, 7 p.m., The Marquee Theater at Union South

Ruth Ozeki is a filmmaker, novelist, and Zen Buddhist priest. Her first novel, My Year of Meats -- published in 1998 by Viking Penguin and garnering widespread glowing reviews, awards, and a still-growing readership -- is a sexy, poignant, funny tale about global meat and media production. Her most recent book, A Tale for the Time Being, ponders global interconnections in our modern world as it tells the story of a diary washed ashore inside a Hello Kitty lunchbox and the profound effect it has on the woman who discovers it. The novel was selected as UW-Madison's Go Big Read selection for 2013-14. In addition to her writing, Ozeki began a film career in the 1980s. Her documentary Body of Correspondence (1994) won the New Visions Award at the San Francisco Film Festival and was aired on PBS. Halving the Bones (1995), an award-winning autobiographical film, tells the story of Ozeki's journey as she brings her grandmother's remains home from Japan. It has been screened at the Sundance Film Festival, the Museum of Modern Art, the Montreal World Film Festival, and the Margaret Mead Film Festival, among others.


Jeffrey Patterson

Jeffrey Patterson
Professor Emeritus, Family Medicine, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health; President, Physicians for Social Responsibility
Discussed Pandora's Promise, Saturday, November 2, 2013, 7 p.m., The Marquee Theater at Union South

Dr. Patterson is professor emeritus in the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health. In this role, he maintains an active family practice and teaches residents in family medicine. He has long been active in Physicians for Social Responsibility (PSR) and is the current President of National PSR. PSR is the U.S. affiliate of The International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War, winners of the 1985 Nobel Peace Prize. He has traveled extensively in the former USSR and lectured about the effects of nuclear weapons and radiation there, in Europe, Japan, as well as in the U.S. Dr. Patterson has visited Chernobyl, the Fukushima area, and sites of nuclear testing in the former Soviet Union and the US. His special interests include the effects of radiation, non-violent alternatives to war as means of preventing war, and sustainable methods of ameliorating global warming.


Jordan Principato

Jordan Principato
Videographer, Protect Our Future
Discussed Protect Our Future, Sunday, November 3, 2013, 1 p.m., UW Cinematheque

Jordan Principato, a 14-year-old freshman at Ashland High School, was the videographer for Protect our Future. Jordan plays football for Ashland High School and also plays hockey and enjoys video games. Film credits include videography for several short documentaries produced at the 2011 Tribal Youth Media Workshop in Bad River.


Alex Rivera

Alex Rivera
Director, Sleep Dealer, The Sixth Section, and Papapapá
Opening Roundtable, Friday, November 1, 2013, 7 p.m., The Marquee Theater at Union South

Alex Rivera is a New York-based digital media artist and filmmaker. His first feature film, Sleep Dealer, premiered at Sundance 2008, and won two awards, including the Waldo Salt Screenwriting Award. Rivera is a Sundance Fellow and a Rockefeller Fellow. His work, which addresses concerns of the Latino community through a language of humor, satire, and metaphor, has also been screened at The Berlin International Film Festival, New Directors/New Films, The Guggenheim Museum, PBS, Telluride, and other international venues. He visited Madison for a week in November 2009 as a guest artist of the university.


Marc Silberman

Marc Silberman
Professor, German, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Introduced Cave of Forgotten Dreams, Saturday, November 2, 2013, 7 p.m., UW Cinematheque

Marc Silberman, professor of German and director of the Center for German and European Studies, joined the UW faculty in 1988. He teaches twentieth-century Germany with special emphasis on postwar issues (east and west) as well as courses in the film studies program (Communications Arts). He is an affiliate faculty member of the Department of Theater and Drama and also sits on the steering committee of the UW Havens Center for the Study of Social Structure and Social Change. His research and publications cover three related fields: the history of German cinema, Bertolt Brecht and the tradition of political theater, and East German literature and culture. He edited the Brecht Yearbook from 1990-1995 and is also active as a translator of German literary texts.


Anna Westerstahl Stenport

Anna Westerstahl Stenport
Associate Professor, Scandinavian Studies, and Director, European Union Center, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Introduced Expedition to the End of the World, Sunday, November 3, 2013, 7 p.m., The Marquee Theater at Union South

Anna Westerståhl Stenport is Associate Professor of Scandinavian Studies and Director of the European Union Center at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. A native of Sweden's Göteborg, she holds B.A. and M.A. degrees from Uppsala University and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. She was a Visiting Associate Professor and Anna Lindh Fellow in the Europe Center at Stanford University during the 2011-12 academic year. She has also taught at UC Berkeley and KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden. Her teaching and scholarship focuses on modern European film, literature, theater, media, and culture, with a particular emphasis on Nordic and Arctic studies. She is the co-editor of the first book on transnational global Arctic film and media, Films on Ice: Cinemas of the Arctic (Edinburgh University Press, 2014; with Scott MacKenzie) and the forthcoming When Worlds Collide: Arctic Ecological Imaginaries (with Lill-Ann Körber and Scott MacKenzie); she has written extensively on contemporary Scandinavian film and media and Swedish playwright August Strindberg.


Steve Stern

Steve Stern
Professor, History, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Introduced Nostalgia for the Light, Saturday, November 2, 2013, 9 p.m., UW Cinematheque

Steve J. Stern is Alberto Flores Galindo and Hilldale Professor of History, and Vice Provost for Faculty and Staff, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He has also served as Chair of the History Department. Stern researches and teaches Latin American history. He was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2012. His research spans five centuries and many countries and demonstrates the inventiveness of Latin American responses to unequal structures of power, with sometimes surprising impact on world history. His recent research focuses on human rights and social memory of "dirty war" eras of the 20th century, notably Chile after the dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet, and Peru after the Shining Path war. External awards include the 2007 Bolton-Johnson Prize for the best book in Latin American history, the "Top-Ten" all-time list on Latin America of the History Book Club, and research fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies, the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, the Fulbright-Hays Faculty Research Program, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Social Science Research Council.


Robert Stone

Robert Stone
Director, Pandora's Promise
Discussed via Skype Pandora's Promise, Saturday, November 2, 2013, 7 p.m., The Marquee Theater at Union South

Robert Stone is a multi-award-winning, Oscar-nominated and Emmy-nominated documentary filmmaker. Born in England in 1958, he grew up in both Europe and America. After graduating with a degree in history from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, he moved to New York City in 1983 determined to pursue a career in filmmaking. He gained considerable recognition for his first film, Radio Bikini (1987) which premiered at Sundance and was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Feature Documentary. Multi-tasking as a producer, director, writer, editor and cameraman, he has over the last 25 years developed a steady international reputation with a range of unique and critically acclaimed feature-documentaries about American history, pop-culture, the mass media and the environment. He is the director of past Tales-sponsored film at the Wisconsin Film Festival Earth Days.


Marta-Laura Suska

Marta-Laura Suska
Ph.D. Student, Anthropology, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Introduced Rio 2096: A Story of Love and Fury, Saturday, November 2, 2013, 9 p.m., Madison Museum of Contemporary Art

Marta-Laura Suska is a doctoral student in Cultural Anthropology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison with a focus on urban violence and preventive policies in Brazil, specifically Rio de Janeiro and Recife. She has lived and worked in Marília, Sao Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, and Recife. She received her master's degree in Latin American Studies from Oxford University in 2011 and her undergraduate training in Philosophy and Cultures at the Univesity of Witten-Herdecke in Germany.


Ahpahnae Thomas

Ahpahnae Thomas
Composer, Protect Our Future
Discussed Protect Our Future, Sunday, November 3, 2013, 1 p.m., UW Cinematheque

Ahpahnae Thomas, a 15-year-old freshman at Mellen High School, composed the original score for Protect our Future. He plays basketball, trumpet, and is a pow wow grass dancer and fancy dancer. In 2013, Ahpahnae was selected as one of Wisconsin's Music Ambassadors. Film credits include music composition for the documentary short, Protect our Rice, produced at the 2011 Tribal Youth Media Workshop in Bad River.


Wilko Graf von Hardenberg

Wilko Graf von Hardenberg
Visiting Assistant Professor, Environmental History, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Introduced Lessons of Darkness, Saturday, November 2, 2013, Noon, The Marquee Theater at Union South

Wilko Graf von Hardenberg is DAAD Visiting Assistant Professor of Environmental History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He mainly focuses on socio-political aspects of nature perception and management in modern Europe, digital history and the history of the environmental sciences. Moreover, he has written on a variety of different topics, including two extensive review articles on the historiography of oil and the representation of the environmental impact of war in documentary films. His two most recent research projects focus respectively on the history of nature conservation, management, and rhetoric in the Alps and on the development of the concept of the mean sea level in both geodesy and the climate sciences.


Eva Weber

Eva Weber
Director, Black Out and The Solitary Life of Cranes
Panel on Future of the Electrical Grid, Sunday, November 3, 2013, 1:45 p.m., The Marquee Theater at Union South;
Discussed Black Out, Sunday, November 3, 2013, 1 p.m., The Marquee Theater at Union South

Originally from Germany, Eva Weber is a London-based independent filmmaker working in both documentary and fiction. She made several award-winning short fiction films before joining the BBC. While working at the BBC, she directed numerous promotions and commercials. Since leaving the BBC, she has developed a number of award-winning documentary film projects, such as The Intimacy of Strangers, which won the President's Award at the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival and screened at over 50 festivals worldwide. She is also the director of past Tales favorite The Solitary Life of Cranes.


Paul Wilson

Paul Wilson
Professor, Nuclear Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Moderated panel discussion on nuclear power following Pandora's Promise, Saturday, November 2, 2013, 7 p.m., The Marquee Theater at Union South

Paul Wilson is a Professor of Nuclear Engineering in the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Department of Engineering Physics, past-Chair of the Energy Analysis and Policy (EAP) Program of the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies, and member of the Holtz Center for Science and Technology Studies steering committee. His research interests bring together technical and policy issues: analysis methods of isotopic inventories in nuclear systems and the implications on nuclear waste and non-proliferation policy, and the development of next generation nuclear power systems to fulfill a role in future energy policy and needs. Paul joined the University of Wisconsin-Madison as an assistant professor in August 2001 as part of the Energy Systems and Policy Hiring Initiative. Paul was the founding President of the North American Young Generation in Nuclear [NA-YGN], an organization created to provide unique opportunities to young professionals in all fields of nuclear science & technology. Paul has been active in the American Nuclear Society for over 15 years, including membership in various committees and chairing the Fuel Cycle and Waste Management Division and the Student Sections Committee.