November 2-4, 2007 · Madison, Wisconsin

2007 Speakers

Schedule Speakers Sponsors

Arnie Alanen

Arnie Alanen
Professor, Landscape Architecture, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Introduced Manufactured Landscapes, , Sunday, November 4, 2007, 4:30 p.m., UW Cinematheque

Arnie Alanen is an emeritus professor of landscape architecture whose primary interests are in landscape history and historic preservation. During his academic career he was heavily involved in documenting cultural landscapes for the National Park Service in Michigan, Wisconsin, and Alaska. He is co-editor of Preserving Cultural Landscapes in America (2000); and author of Morgan Park: Duluth, U.S. Steel, and the Forging of a Company Town (2007). Another volume, Main Street Ready-Made: The New Deal Community of Greendale, Wisconsin (1987), was republished by the Wisconsin Historical Society Press in 2012 to mark the 75th anniversary of the settlement.


Omie Baldwin

Omie Baldwin
Clinical Social Worker Emerita, University Health Services, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Discussed The Return of Navajo Boy, Sunday, November 4, 2007, 11 a.m., UW Cinematheque

A member of the Dinè Nation (also known as Navajos), Omie Baldwin has been the organizer for the participation of the Americas Indigenous peoples in the Council for a Parliament of the World Religions since 1993. An emerita clinical social worker at UW-Madison, University Health Services, Baldwin has been involved with the Native American students on campus and is a leading expert in the problems facing indigenous populations. She has also been active in her Diné Nation home community on the Navajo Nation in Arizona. Baldwin has been a board member of the Fund of the Sacred Circle, Headwaters Foundation for Peace & Social Justice, which fund groups advocating for social change.


Dave Cieslewicz

Dave Cieslewicz
Mayor, City of Madison
Festival Welcome, Friday, November 2, 2007, 7:30 p.m., Orpheum Theatre

Dave Cieslewicz served as mayor of Madison, Wisconsin from 2003 to 2011. Born and raised in the Milwaukee suburb of West Allis, he came to Madison as a student at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Prior to seeking the mayor's office, Cieslewicz served as executive director of "1000 Friends of Wisconsin," a land use advocacy organization that successfully lobbied for Wisconsin's Smart Growth planning law. He has had additional political experience as a staffer in the Wisconsin State Legislature, as a lobbyist for the Nature Conservancy, and as an elected member of the Dane County Board of Supervisors.


Kelley Conway

Kelley Conway
Associate Professor, Film, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Discussed Science is Fiction: The Films of Jean Painlevé, Saturday, November 3, 2007, 1:45 p.m., Madison Museum of Contemporary Art

Kelley Conway is an associate professor of film at UW-Madison. Her research interests include French film of all eras, women's history and gender studies, and the intersections between film and other forms of popular culture. She has written on Agnès Varda's key films, her working methods, and her films' reception as well as on 1950s French film culture.


William Cronon

William Cronon
Professor, Departments of History, Geography, and Environmental Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Introduced Bill McKibben, Friday, November 2, 2007, 7:30 p.m., Orpheum Theatre

William Cronon studies American environmental history and the history of the American West. His research seeks to understand the history of human interactions with the natural world: how we depend on the ecosystems around us to sustain our material lives, how we modify the landscapes in which we live and work, and how our ideas of nature shape our relationships with the world around us. An award-winning scholar, he has authored Changes in the Land: Indians, Colonists, and the Ecology of New England (1983) and Nature's Metropolis (1991), as well as co-edited Under an Open Sky: Rethinking America's Western Past (1992) and Uncommon Ground: Rethinking the Human Place in Nature (1995). The Frederick Jackson Turner Professor of History, Geography, and Environmental Studies at the University of Wisconsin­Madison since 1992, in 2003 Cronon was also named Vilas Research Professor at UW-Madison, the university's most distinguished chaired professorship. He is a founding faculty fellow of UW-Madison’s Center for Culture, History, and Environment (CHE), created in 2006, and served as its Director from 2007-11. He has served on the Governing Council of The Wilderness Society since 1995, and on the National Board of the Trust for Public Land since 2003. He served as President of the American Historical Association during 2012.


Lloyd Spencer Davis

Lloyd Spencer Davis
Professor of Science Communication, University of Otago
Discussed Flock of Dodos, Saturday, November 3, 2007, 11 a.m., Orpheum Theatre; Led From Frozen Toes to Happy Feet: The Truth About Penguins, Sunday, November 4, 2007, 11 a.m., Orpheum Theatre

Lloyd Spencer Davis is a scholar, author, and filmmaker and one of the world's leading experts on penguins. Hailing from Dunedin, he is the author of Penguin: a season in the life of the Adélie penguin, for which he received the PEN (NZ) Best First Book Award for Nonfiction; The Plight of the Penguin, which was NZ Post's New Zealand Children's Book of the Year in 2002, as well as the winner of the nonfiction category at the same awards; and Looking for Darwin, for which he received a CLL Writer's Award – New Zealand's most significant award for the support of nonfiction – and the Runner's Up Award as the New Zealand Travel Book of the Year, 2008. He also writes essays for magazines like Natural History and newspapers like the Star Sunday Times: his topics usually involve nature or science and his approach is often very personal. In addition, he currently holds the Stuart Chair in Science Communication at the University of Otago.


Tom Givnish

Tom Givnish
Professor, Botany and Environmental Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Introduced Flock of Dodos, Saturday, November 3, 2007, 11 a.m., Orpheum Theatre

Tom Givnish is the Henry Allan Gleason Professor of Botany and Environmental Studies at UW-Madison. He explores questions involving the interface of ecology, evolution, systematics, and biogeography. His research involves a wide range of terrestrial, wetland, and aquatic systems, and monocot and dicot lineages around the world, examining such topics as adaptive radiation, phylogeography, physiological ecology, and conservation biology. He is a Fellow of the Linnean Society of London, a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and Past President of the Aldo Leopold Chapter of the Society for Conservation Biology.


Daniel Gold

Daniel Gold
Co-Director/Co-Producer/Director of Photography, Everything's Cool
Discussed Everything's Cool, Friday, November 2, 2007, 7:30 p.m., Orpheum Theatre

Daniel B. Gold won the 2002 Sundance "Excellence in Cinematography Award" for his work on Blue Vinyl, which he co-directed and co-produced. That film also garnered him two Emmy Nominations: one for Research, and one for Best Documentary. In 2002, Blue Vinyl was broadcast on HBO's America Undercover. In 2007, Gold's work as DP was featured in several new documentaries including Coma, a 90-minute Moxie Firecracker special on HBO; New Orleans, an Insignia Films two-hour PBS special American Experience; Saint Misbehavin': The Life and Times of Wavy Gravy; Coal Miners, a Barbara Kopple one-hour HBO special, and a theatrical release of Toots Shore: Bigger Than Life, which premiered at Tribeca film festival in 2006. Prior to concentrating on feature documentaries, Gold's camerawork was frequently seen on Saturday Night Live, Dateline NBC, and The Hallmark Channel.


Roberta Hill

Roberta Hill
Professor, English and American Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Discussed The Silent Enemy, Saturday, November 3, 2007, 1:45 p.m., Orpheum Theatre

Roberta Hill is a professor of English and American Studies at UW-Madison. Her research interests include twentieth century literature and history; race, gender, class and ethnicity; life writing with an emphasis in minority discourse; creative writing; and American Indian literature. She is the author of the books Star Quilt (1985) and Philadelphia Flowers (1994) and her short stories and poems have appeared in, among other places, The Southern Review, Northwest Review, American Poetry Review, The Nation, North American Review, and The Norton Anthology of Modern Poetry.


William P. Jones

William P. Jones
Professor, History, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Discussed Harlan County, U.S.A., Saturday, November 3, 2007, 7 p.m., Orpheum Theatre

Will Jones is a historian of the 20th Century United States, with a particular interest in race, class and work. He has written books on African American industrial workers in the Jim Crow South and the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom in 1963. He is currently writing a book on public employees and the transformation of the U.S. economy after the Second World War.


Judd Kinzley

Judd Kinzley
Assistant Professor, History, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Introduced Fallen City, Saturday, November 2, 2013, 3:45 p.m., Madison Museum of Contemporary Art

Judd Kinzley is a historian of modern Chinese history at the University of Wisconsin-Madison with research and teaching interests that include environmental history, state power, industrial development, and wartime mobilization. His research tends to center around understanding the connections that exist between state power and the natural world in various Chinese peripheral and border regions. He is currently working on a manuscript on mining and the extension of the Chinese state into Xinjiang province in China's far west during the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries.


Maria Lepowsky

Maria Lepowsky
Professor, Anthropology, University of Wisconsin - Madison
Introduced Ten Canoes; Saturday, November 3, 2007, 4:30 p.m., Orpheum Theatre

Maria Lepowsky is a professor of anthropology at UW-Madison. Her work specializes in cultural anthropology, anthropology of gender, historical anthropology, history of anthropology, environmental anthropology, exchange and ritual, medical/nutritional anthropology, psychological anthropology, Pacific Islands, California and the American West.


Jennifer Martin
Ph.D. Candidate, History, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Introduced The Silent World, Saturday, November 3, 2007, 11 a.m., Madison Museum of Contemporary Art

Jennifer Martin received her Ph.D. in History from UW-Madison. Her dissertation explored how Americans' ideas about sharks - as garbage fish, perfectly-evolved killing machines, endangered marine predators, or luxury consumer goods—have expressed themselves via scientific, cultural, and commercial practices. She received a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of California Santa Barbara.


Bill McKibben

Bill McKibben
Author, Eaarth
Keynote Address, The Nature of Hope, Friday, November 2, 2007, 7:30 p.m., Orpheum Theatre

To kick off our first festival, Bill McKibben, "The Poet Laureate of Global Warming," delivered a keynote address entitled "The Nature of Hope." He is the author of a dozen books about the environment, beginning with The End of Nature in 1989, which is regarded as the first book for a general audience on climate change. He is a founder of the grassroots climate campaign 350.org, which has coordinated 15,000 rallies in 189 countries since 2009. Time called him "the planet's best green journalist" and the Boston Globe said in 2010 that he was "'probably the country's most important environmentalist." Schumann Distinguished Scholar at Middlebury College, he holds honorary degrees from a dozen colleges, including the Universities of Massachusetts and Maine, the State University of New York, and Whittier and Colgate Colleges. In 2011 he was elected a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.


Curt Meine

Curt Meine
Senior Fellow, The Aldo Leopold Foundation
Discussed Bambi, Sunday, November 4, 2007, 1:45 p.m., Orpheum Theatre

Curt Meine is considered the authoritative biographer of conservation great Aldo Leopold. He earned both a Master's and Ph.D. at UW-Madison Nelson Institute's Land Resources program. His doctoral dissertation became Aldo Leopold: His Life and Work (University of Wisconsin Press, 1988). Following graduate school, he worked with the U.S. National Academy of Sciences on a series of reports on biodiversity conservation, sustainable agriculture, and international development. He returned to Wisconsin to work with the International Crane Foundation, just a few miles down the road from the Aldo Leopold Foundation near Baraboo. These two organizations have a long history of cooperative work, and together with many other local organizations make the area an unusually rich place for conservation activity. Additionally, he teaches and advises students at UW-Madison from time to time as an adjunct faculty member. He was an integral adviser to the film Green Fire, about the creation of Aldo Leopold's "land ethic" idea.


Randy Olson

Randy Olson
Director, Flock of Dodos
Discussed Flock of Dodos, Saturday, November 3, 2007, 11 a.m., Orpheum Theatre

Before he became a filmmaker, Randy Olson was a humble, mild-mannered professor of marine biology at the University of New Hampshire. But then his brain sort of turned inside out and he shifted from scientist to artist. Today he is an independent filmmaker and no longer considers himself a scientist, but is now fluent in the two languages of science and cinema. In addition to writing and directing his own feature films about major issues in science, he has worked with a variety of clients to assist them with the use of visual media in communicating science to the general public. Through his writings he has both related his journey, and continues his exploration into the role of storytelling in the mass communication of science.


Ken Raffa

Ken Raffa
Professor, Entomology, University of Wisconsin-Madison,
Discussed
Microcosmos, Saturday, November 3, 2007, 4:30 p.m., Madison Museum of Contemporary Art

Ken Raffa is the Beers-Bascom Professor of Conservation in entomology at UW-Madison. His research addresses mechanisms that drive the population dynamics of forest insects, with special emphasis on plant-insect interactions, predator-prey relationships, and insect-microbial-symbioses. He investigates each within the context of host plant properties that affect herbivore behavior, reproduction, and susceptibility to natural enemies, as well as herbivore counter-adaptations against multiple ecological constraints. He analyzes biological thresholds and cross-scale interactions in insect outbreaks. His study systems involve insects that pose challenges to natural resource management, so this information can improve our ability to address invasive species, sustainable production systems, biodiversity, and global change. Raffa is the recipient of the 2011 Silverstein-Simeone Award from the International Society of Chemical Ecology and the 2010 Founders Award, Entomological Society of America.


Ravi Rajan

Ravi Rajan
Associate Professor, Environmental Studies, University of California Santa Cruz,
Discussed
Bhopal Express, Sunday, November 4, 2007, 1:45 p.m., UW Cinematheque

Ravi Rajan is an associate professor of environmental studies at the University of California Santa Cruz. He has been a senior research fellow at the Asia Research Institute at the National University of Singapore. Rajan has also been a Visiting Senior Fellow of The Energy and Resources Institute (TERI), New Delhi, and a Visiting Professor at TERI University. He was educated at the Universities of Delhi and Oxford, and received post-doctoral training at Berkeley, Cornell, and the Max Planck Institüt für Wissenschaftsgeschichte, Berlin. Rajan has three broad research interests: a) Environmentally Inclusive Governance; b) The Governance of Environmental Risks; and c) Green Design and Entrepreneurship. He is Chair of the Outreach Committee of the American Society for Environmental History, and has served on many of its committees in the past, including as the Program Chair for the Society's Annual Meeting. He was a founding member of the editorial board of the journal, Environment and History. He currently serves on the editorial board of the journal, Environmental Justice, and of the book series of the European Society for Environmental History. He has served as a reviewer for the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Economic and Social Research Council (UK), as well as for a number of leading journals and publishers.


Kathryn Sanchez

Kathryn Sanchez
Professor, Spanish and Portuguese, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Discussed High Over the Borders and The Three Caballeros, Sunday, November 4, 2007, 7 p.m., Orpheum Theatre

Kathryn Sanchez is a professor of Spanish and Portuguese at UW-Madison. Her interests include nineteenth and twentieth-century Luso-Brazilian narrative, contemporary women writers, visual culture, women and performativity, gender studies and the cultural representation of race. Her first book Utopias Desmascaradas: O Mito do Bom Selvagem e a Procura do Homem Natural na Obra de Almeida Garrett was published with the Portuguese National Press, Imprensa Nacional – Casa da Moeda, Lisbon, 2008. Her second book, Visual Impact: Race, Camp and Gender in the Making of Carmen Miranda, is forthcoming with Vanderbilt University Press. Her current research projects focus on the performance of women on the casino stage in Latin America, 1918-1946; and Brazil and the cultural representation of race abroad.


Dietram Scheufele

Dietram Scheufele
Professor, Science Communication, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Discussed Flock of Dodos, Saturday, November 3, 2007, 11 a.m., Orpheum Theatre

Dietram A. Scheufele is the John E. Ross Professor in Science Communication at UW-Madison and Honorary Professor of Communication at the Dresden University of Technology (Germany). He serves as Co-PI of the Center for Nanotechnology in Society at Arizona State University, and currently also co-chairs the National Academies' Roundtable on Public Interfaces of the Life Sciences. An elected fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts & Letters, Scheufele has been a tenured faculty member at Cornell University, a Shorenstein fellow at Harvard University, and a DAAD Visiting Professor at the Technische Universität Dresden. His consulting experience includes work for PBS, the World Health Organization, the World Bank, and other corporate and public sector clients in the U.S., Asia, Europe, and the Middle East.


Sarita Siegel

Sarita Siegel
Director, Fire, Burn, Babylon
Discussed Fire, Burn, Babylon, Saturday, November 3, 2007, 7:30 p.m., Madison Museum of Contemporary Art

Sarita Siegel has been filmmaking for over 15 years in America, New Zealand, and England. Her current project, Outspoken, is a feature documentary chronicling the international community of young rap activists demanding change across the globe. Siegel's documentary subjects often lie at the intersection between nature and culture. Her films have a love for heroes and visionaries, as well as anti-heroes and underdogs. Siegel strives to bring characters into focus that might otherwise be overlooked in our fast moving world. Sarita Siegel created Alchemy Films in 1994 with Taggart Siegel. Alchemy Films has made award-winning cross-cultural films and natural history subjects with an awareness of conservation that have been broadcast on National Geographic Channels, PBS, ARTE, and France Channel 5. Past Alchemy Titles include The Split Horn (2001), The Disenchanted Forest (2002), Destroying Angel (1995) and The Beloved (1997).


Jeff Spitz

Jeff Spitz
Director, Food Patriots and Return of Navajo Boy
Discussed Return of Navajo Boy, Sunday, November 4, 2007, 11 a.m., UW Cinematheque

Jeff Spitz is an Emmy Award winner who creates original documentaries for broadcast on PBS and cable. His credits as a writer/producer/director include: The Return of Navajo Boy, a one-hour documentary that reunited a Navajo family, premiered at the Sundance Film Festival, and has screened and won awards at film festivals internationally (it also screened at Tales from Planet Earth 2007); From the Bottom Up, a one-hour, national PBS public affairs report on community activism; The Roosevelt Experiment, a half-hour documentary for ABC-TV telling the story of an integrated college in a segregated city; and America's Libraries Change Lives, celebrating the immigrant experience in America's public libraries, narrated by Whoopi Goldberg. A California native and graduate of UCLA, Spitz teaches documentary filmmaking at Columbia College Chicago.


Brett Walker

Brett Walker
Professor, History, Montana State University
Discussed Nausicaa of the Valley of the Winds, Sunday, November 4, 2007, 4:30 p.m., Orpheum Theatre

Brett L. Walker is Regents Professor and Michael P. Malone Professor of History at Montana State University, Bozeman. He received a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2013 for his project, "The Slow Dying: Asbestos and the Unmaking of the Modern World." He studies environmental history, the history of human health, and the history of science. His books explore how humans have altered the environment, or have been altered by the environment, across both historical time and geographic space. He investigates how nature, in manifestations ranging from infectious disease to nonhuman animals, has imposed its way onto the human past, as well as how humans have sliced, burned, extracted and engineered their needs and desires onto Earth and its living organisms. His research area is early modern and modern Japanese history, as well as comparative world history.